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Outdoor kitten won't use litter box

  1. #1

    Outdoor kitten won't use litter box

    Hello everyone,
    I have a 10 week old kittens who loves being outside. We have a good fence in our yard, and I am almost always available to watch him. He doesn't leave the yard. At night we put him in his crate, with a litter box, food, and water. He doesn't like to go in the litter box, he prefers the garden boxes. This is a problem because cat feces is toxic to plants, and we eat the food that grows from the plants. Whenever I see him digging, I gently pick him up and put him in the litter box, and he'll usually go. When he's on his own, he goes in the dirt. Will he eventually learn if I keep putting him in the box? I clean it once a day, and I've mixed some dirt in as well.


    Thanks for your time!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    New Hampshire
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    he doesn't leave the yard yet because he's to young but as he matures and grows his roaming will increase. Maybe he doesn't like the litter, if its a gravely kind and he's used to going outside he may not like the feal of it on his feet. Try using a fine grain litter, something more sand like. You can also put some grass or leaves in it to make it seem more like outside. When you put him in the litter box take your fingers and start digging around, cats like to mimic your actions and he may get the idea

    Just a side note, if you are planning on neutering him do it by the time he is 5 months old. If you wait longer he may start spraying in your house. You have to do it before he's sexually mature, if you wait to long he will spray and that is not something you want to deal with. Once they start spraying its almost impossible to stop
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  3. #3
    I have had cats before, and they start to leave the yard later. We live in a very safe neighborhood, and all of our cats are still alive (we had to give them away when we temporarily moved). I am planning to neuter him once he's old enough. I did the same to my old cat and he never sprayed I'll try some other litter. He just went pee in the litter box a few minutes ago, but I had to put him in his crate because he kept scratching the dirt instead of the litter box. Thanks for your reply!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    PA USA
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    2,326
    Going outside isn't safe at all...the world is a cruel place. Why do you keep him in a crate at night? He should have freedom inside your house IMO. Have another litterbox with different litter in it so he has a choice. He will get the hang of using the litterbox...it's natural for cats.
    “Save a life and save a stray”

  5. #5
    I know many people hate when cats are allowed to go outside, but doesn't it make more sense to have them outside? Cats are much happier with freedom. Where do they come from in the first place? Cats are outdoor animals. I've never had trouble with cats being outside, they came home on time, and they are generally healthier. Never gave my cats shots either, and one of ours (who loved outside in a rural area) is still alive at 18 years. She used to catch rattlesankes for sport.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    PA USA
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    I disagree and so do many people and here are some reasons:
    The Not-So-Great Outdoors

    Feline AIDS is a highly contagious, incurable disease for which there is no vaccine. It can only be prevented by keeping cats indoors. It is one of several deadly diseases that cats who roam outdoors can catch. Unattended cats also face dangers posed by dogs, wildlife, and the scariest predator of all, humans.
    Thieves, or “bunchers,” cruise neighborhoods for friendly dogs and cats who can easily be picked up and sold to dealers, who in turn sell them to laboratories. Cats are often poisoned, shot, set on fire, or trapped and drowned by intolerant neighbors or bored juveniles. They are hit by cars, accidentally poisoned by spilled antifreeze, or maimed by fan blades when they crawl into warm engines on winter days.
    https://www.peta.org/living/companio...s/indoor-cats/
    “Save a life and save a stray”

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    PA USA
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    2,326
    Also if you know they love freedom you wouldn't crate him at all.
    “Save a life and save a stray”

  8. #8
    He has a lot of space for at least 10 hours. I'm not abusing my cat by letting him stay outside. I know all of you are strong advocates for indoor cats, but I'm not going to put him in the house. I don't see people confining other animals in their houses. Indoor cats are more prone to obesity. We have rodents that need to be taken care of.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    a ten week old kitten is not going to be killing mice. I have a bengal who is a natural born hunter and he didn't catch his first mouse until he was 5 months old.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  10. #10
    Oh, I know he won't be catching mice yet. I've always done cats like this, and I'm not going to change. I don't mean to upset anyone.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Gainesville, Florida
    Posts
    78
    If you are unwilling to change, why do you want advice from people who strongly disapprove of letting cats spend any amount of time outside, even with human supervision? All you will get here are recommendations to keep your kitty indoors 24/7 and train him to use the litterbox because there are mountains of scientific and medical evidence to prove cats are much healthier with an exclusively indoor lifestyle.
    There is no such thing as a cat owner. Cats are children with fur, paws, and whiskers.

  12. #12
    You could build a very large pen for him, that is away from your food plant area. Put his box in there. You can make a cover for it so he can't get out and wander off to dangers.

    You could do what someone did while I was away one day. I have a litter box on a closed in porch (has glass wall/doors), and sometimes I leave the door opened a crack for fresh air. Apparently a neighbor decided it would be a good idea to come inside and fill the litter box with dirt from the freshly re-done landscaping (actually, I think it was someone with dementia, because I live in a senior community). I don't think the cats minded it at all, but I was shocked. Using dirt would be more economical than cat litter, and could be mixed in the mulch pile if you have one.

Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

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