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indoor cats vs outdoor cats

  1. #1
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    indoor cats vs outdoor cats

    Outdoor Cats Can Get Hit or Harmed By Cars

    Some cat parents insist that nothing bad can happen to their kitty outdoors — but that’s just untrue. While there are still rural places in the U.S. without nearby roads and lots of cars, those locations remain the exception. Still, many insist their cats are too clever to get in the way of a car. But it turns out that, according to the National Traffic Safety Administration, 5.4 million cats are hit by cars each year in the United States, and 97 percent of those cats die. There’s no data to reveal how many of these cats are owned or unowned, but these numbers clearly demonstrate that the notion that cats are too ingenious to get hit by cars is a myth.
    And getting hit isn’t the only car hazard. In cold weather, cats seek heat, and slinking under a car hood can be a feline version of an electric blanket — until an unknowing driver starts the car.
    A few licks of sweet-tasting antifreeze can kill a cat, unless it’s a pet-safe product.
    Cats can also nibble on plants treated with pesticides or plants that may be tasty but are also toxic.
    Outdoor Cats Are Prone to Diseases from Ticks and Mosquitos, Like Heartworm

    Another myth about outdoor cats is that they aren’t prone to tick disease. While Lyme disease may not make cats ill, there’s plenty that’s delivered by the bloodsuckers that can: cytauxzoonosis (sometimes called bobcat fever), ehrlichiosis, haemobartonellosis, babesiosis and tularemia. Using a veterinary tick protection, tick disease might be prevented, and the same to stop flea bites that can also cause disease.
    Mosquitoes carry heartworm, and the American Heartworm Society points out that all cats should be protected, as mosquitoes do get indoors. You’d think that all cats going outdoors would receive protection, but few do. In cats, heartworm can cause heartworm associated respiratory disease (creating asthma-like symptoms), and heartworm is one of the most common causes of sudden death in cats.
    While heartworm treatment is uncomfortable (and expensive) for dogs, in cats there’s a larger problem — there’s no treatment for heartworm (short of prevention).


    Other Animals Can Injure or Kill Outdoor Cats

    It’s not only parasites that threaten outdoor cats. There’s a long list of predators, including coyotes, foxes, wolves, large birds of prey, stray dogs and even other cats — who may share infectious disease like feline leukemia or the feline immunodeficiency virus.
    Cats are also a threat to other animals, as cats are both predator and prey. Numbers floated by some bird organizations may be exaggerated, but cats do certainly kill birds and other wildlife. There is an ethical question about allowing cats outdoors. Even well-fed cats will sometimes bring home a “gift.”
    Outdoor Cats Are a Nuisance to Your Neighbors

    What’s more, allowing cats to use the neighbor’s lawn as their litter box or playing on their car (and possibly scratching it) is just plain rude. And just being in front of a neighbor’s home (perhaps more likely to appear knowing there are cats indoors in that home), those indoor cats may begin to spray in response. Inappropriate elimination is the most common explanation for relinquishing cats to shelters. There are people who give up on their indoor cats, all because of outdoor cats who have wreaked havoc among those inside cats — it happens all the time.
    Indoor Cats May be More Susceptible to These Diseases

    There’s a surprising medical revelation about a shortcoming of cats living indoors only. While indoor cats are safer, there’s one silent danger lurking inside the home that may cause or contribute to the likelihood of hyperthyroid disease in cats. Studies show that cats with hyperthyroid disease often have elevated levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) which are found on furniture treated with flame retardants and carpet pad- ding, among other places. When diagnosed, hyperthyroid disease can be treated and controlled or even cured.
    Cats are also experiencing cancers more often than, say, 60 years ago. Cats share our environment, so it’s possible that the same environmental factors causing cancers in people may also be making cats sick.
    Indoor Cats Can Actually Get Sick from Boredom

    Dr. Tony Buffington, legendary veterinarian, an emeritus professor of veterinary clinical sciences at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, a clinical professor at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and an honorary research fellow at the University of Bristol, School of Veterinary Sciences discovered that unenriched environments are actually stressful to cats. As a result, boredom may actually make cats sick, causing idiopathic lower urinary tract disease (now dubbed “Pandora Syndrome”). And this disease can be painful, which causes some cats to urinate outside the litter box, which can cause frustrated owners to give up their cats. Allowed outdoors to explore, boredom is never an issue, but for the indoor-only cat, enriching the environment with things like cat trees, window perches and lots of toys is essential for optimal cat health.
    Indoor Cats Are More Likely to be Overweight

    Also, with more to do, cats tend be more active — and not as likely to be overweight or obese, as 60 percent of cats in the U.S. are. And there is a correlation to arthritis and diabetes, among other medical issues, in fat cats.

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  2. #2
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    For years I dreamed about writing a book about the dangers of letting or keeping cats outside with the obvious exception of semi-ferals who would be dangerous to humans indoors. The outdoor world is that bad for cats and most of the time there is no excuse for not keeping them inside 24/7. I am not a vet though, so such a book would not be profitable.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  3. #3
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    I have two window boxes so mine can go out safely, its about as big as a window air conditioner, solid top and bottom and caged in on all sides, nothing can get to them and they can't get out, the door is magnetic and opens inside the house so they go out and watch the wildlife and lay in the sun
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  4. #4
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    I mean really out, no walls around them. Sorry if there was a misunderstanding.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  5. #5
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    I know what you meant, but this works for me, they can go out safely and nothing can get to them and they can't be out killing things
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    I know what you meant, but this works for me, they can go out safely and nothing can get to them and they can't be out killing things
    Or getting hurt, of course. I wish more people were able to get that type of enclosure for their cats.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  7. #7
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    Mine are solely outside, they prefer it that way as well.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristaok View Post
    Mine are solely outside, they prefer it that way as well.
    Do they come in to eat, drink, and use the litterbox?
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

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