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Solliquin for vet trips

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
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    438

    Question Solliquin for vet trips

    When I take Daisy to the vet for a pedicure (I can't clip her claws myself), getting her in the carrier is obviously easier said than done. Last time I talked to the veterinary technician about it after she brought Daisy back to the waiting room. She said cats are claustrophobic and suggested giving Daisy something called Solliquin to calm her down. Daisy does not meow in the car. She is fine at the vet. It is just the normal "Don't put me in that thing!" issue you all know about. Daisy's carrier is big enough for a 10-pound cat (she weighs 7 pounds) and has two doors, mesh on three sides, and a bottom cushion. It is the only one I have ever put her in and has never been used by any other cat. So next time I take her there for a claw trim (she needs that done every 6-8 weeks), I want to know if I should order Solliquin during the appointment. Has anyone ever used it for this purpose in an otherwise calm feline?



    Information from the brochure:

    BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SUPPLEMENT

    "I encourage clients to administer a behavioral supplement for at least 6-8 weeks. While some benefits are apparent immediately the full effect may be more noticeable in the second month of the continuous administration." - Theresa DePorter, DVM

    *Relaxation without sedation
    *Intended for daily use
    *Tasty chewables

    Daisy is not due for a wellness exam until January, so she will have one more pedicure before I can talk to him about it. The technician said some vets use it on their own cats.

    BTW no appointments have been scheduled yet.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,730
    I personally wouldn't give the cat anything like that just to get her in the carrier. My cat makes a fuss too when I go to put him in or take him out of the carrier at the vets. Daisy is calm in the car, many cats IMO, are not claustrophobic in carriers, it makes them feel secure. I read that the product is only available through vets, that to me is a red flag....they are probably encouraged to make sales for dogs and cats and move the stuff for the company. They'll say what they have to to sell you the product, especially if it's something that is taken many times or for long periods of time.

    The cat is okay before the carrier, in the carrier, at the vet and when you get back home. I don't think getting the cat in there warrants any kind of medication, even if it's a supplement only. I usually set my carrier on the kitchen table or on the bed, and open it so it's ready. I do that early so the cat doesn't take off hiding in the basement.....or, just open it on the bed, close the bedroom door so the cat doesn't even see it, then hold the cat, open the door, and shove him in there, the quicker it's done, the easier for you.

    Here's a technique, I haven't used it though, I just hold him, grab his scruff and kind of push his rear until he's in there and it's zippered.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    865
    What our vet back home in Seattle told our family to do, and what we always did for many years was:

    Put the carrier on the floor and turn it onto its "back side" so that the open door is face UP in the air. Now just pick up your cat and lower him/her into the carrier feet first. No need to cover their eyes. They do not object to entering the carrier in this manner. Close the door and turn the carrier back to its natural position. Cat in carrier. No fuss.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,870
    I have a backpack style carrier, I just unzip the front and tell him to get in, he jumps right in and I zip it up. At the vet's I unzip it and he gets out, when the vet is done I just tell him to get back in and he jumps right in. With Nanny I unzip it and because she loves bags of any kind when its unzipped she just goes inside and lays down, I zip it up and off we go.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Force One View Post
    What our vet back home in Seattle told our family to do, and what we always did for many years was:

    Put the carrier on the floor and turn it onto its "back side" so that the open door is face UP in the air. Now just pick up your cat and lower him/her into the carrier feet first. No need to cover their eyes. They do not object to entering the carrier in this manner. Close the door and turn the carrier back to its natural position. Cat in carrier. No fuss.
    Patricia's first vet suggested doing that when I showed him my scratch marks from trying to get her in. Since getting my first soft-sided carrier, I have sworn by them because it is easy to get cats in a top door and zip it up.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    865
    Hi CatMom-

    One of my cats in Japan used to freak out when being transported to the vet in a roomy cage (used only for transport) until the vet there told me that cats do not like to be able to see in more than one direction from their carrier. In other words, a cat only wants to have to monitor one direction from which they could potentially be attacked by an enemy. So that vet advised draping a bath towel over the cage to cover all the sides except the front side. Sure enough, suddenly my cat made no more fuss going to the vet. As long as she could only see out in one direction she felt safe and calm.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Force One View Post
    Hi CatMom-

    One of my cats in Japan used to freak out when being transported to the vet in a roomy cage (used only for transport) until the vet there told me that cats do not like to be able to see in more than one direction from their carrier. In other words, a cat only wants to have to monitor one direction from which they could potentially be attacked by an enemy. So that vet advised draping a bath towel over the cage to cover all the sides except the front side. Sure enough, suddenly my cat made no more fuss going to the vet. As long as she could only see out in one direction she felt safe and calm.
    That's weird. I read in Cat Fancy cats don't like covered litterboxes because they want to see threats coming from every direction.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

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