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Pitbulls?

  1. #31
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    they chase because you run (or bike). If you stop they probably will also. The goal is to get you away from what they consider their territory, like barking at the mailman, you bark, the mailman goes away, but they have to keep telling him to go away every day because he always comes back. Nothing personal, just a dog thing
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    they chase because you run (or bike). If you stop they probably will also. The goal is to get you away from what they consider their territory, like barking at the mailman, you bark, the mailman goes away, but they have to keep telling him to go away every day because he always comes back. Nothing personal, just a dog thing
    That is not a breed thing. Just being a dog.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  3. #33
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    Pitbulls are banned where I live. Animals are unpredictable no matter how well trained they are because they act on instinct not reason. I really don't understand why people would want to own a dog that has the potential to kill. Not saying pitbulls has some sort of instinct to kill, just saying all dogs have the potential to attack or at least bite, and a pitbull's bite can be and in many cases has been lethal.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechi2 View Post
    Pitbulls are banned where I live. Animals are unpredictable no matter how well trained they are because they act on instinct not reason. I really don't understand why people would want to own a dog that has the potential to kill. Not saying pit bulls has some sort of instinct to kill, just saying all dogs have the potential to attack or at least bite, and a pit bull's bite can be and in many cases has been lethal.
    Any hunting dog can bite or injure person. Pit bulls get all the bad rap as if no other breeds have the same instinct that can be dangerous to people and pets. Maybe this is because their bite is stronger or they attack more often, I don't know. Pit bulls are too big for apartment or condo life anyway, so it makes sense to ban them in those dwellings. But I oppose any kind of law banning pit bulls or pit mixes.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechi2 View Post
    Pitbulls are banned where I live. Animals are unpredictable no matter how well trained they are because they act on instinct not reason. I really don't understand why people would want to own a dog that has the potential to kill. Not saying pitbulls has some sort of instinct to kill, just saying all dogs have the potential to attack or at least bite, and a pitbull's bite can be and in many cases has been lethal.
    I have to disagree with you on that, and why would a person want a dog that will bite? Look around you, do you feel safe walking outside with all the thugs, murderers and rapists out there? Do you fear a child molester will get your kids? My shepherd will bite, she will protect the family, she won't back down. I can walk anywhere I want at any time and when she's with me I don't fear being attacked. I don't worry about a home invasion, I don't worry about a child molester if my kids are out in the yard. A gun will stop her yes, but that will draw attention and attention is the last thing they want. They would rather go for someone easy to control and comply. So you might want to rethink your position on having a dog that will bite. It may save your life one day
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  6. #36
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    Well actually I wouldn't want to have a dog as a weapon either. For me dogs are a source of companionship not protection. Taking precautions to protect myself against the things you mentioned to me is a safer alternative. And any dog can be a deterrent to a break in, I feel safer at home with a Chihuahua than during periods not having a dog because crooks tend to avoid homes with noisy dogs. Anyway that's just my opinion.

  7. #37
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    For people who live in high-crime areas, protection is the main reason to have a dog, but not a violent one that is likely to bite anybody on the street. There also are people who need service animals for a lot more reasons than you might know about. They would never get a biter because those dogs are trained to not be mean to anyone. Everyone else should have a companion dog for no other reason.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  8. #38
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    To each his own, my dog is a companion but having a dog that I know would come through for me if I needed her to is a great sense of security. your chi is a great deterrent if someone wants to break in but if you are attacked there isn't much a little dog can do to protect you if the need arises
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    but if you are attacked there isn't much a little dog can do to protect you if the need arises
    Very true, in fact there was an incident years ago when I was in my teens, my brother and I were alone and we thought someone was trying to break into the house. I locked my chi in the bathroom because I didn't want her to get hurt by the intruder in case we needed to make a run for it (turned out to be my neighbor). But getting back to pitbulls, the previous poster mentioned service dogs, so I'm wondering anyone know of pit bulls being used as service dogs?

  10. #40
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    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by CatMom1994 View Post
    For people who live in high-crime areas, protection is the main reason to have a dog, but not a violent one that is likely to bite anybody on the street. There also are people who need service animals for a lot more reasons than you might know about. They would never get a biter because those dogs are trained to not be mean to anyone. Everyone else should have a companion dog for no other reason.
    I don't live in a high crime area, pretty much woods and country. One day I was out with Phoenix for her daily run in the woods. A man jumped out at me from behind a tree. Really bad idea on his part
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  12. #42
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    Well as the article admitted a pit bull as a service dog is an "anomaly" and it was trained by an organization that wants to "help pummel the pit bull stigma".

  13. #43
    Based off of experience with my friends' pitbulls. They're quite adorable and playful. I think it really depends on how you raise/train them.
    Dog tracks are amazing lmao

  14. #44
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    It is often assumed that ‘Pit Bulls’ have an innate tendency for aggression due to their historical background, therefore are a threat to the public, but it must also be noted that although some American Pit Bull Terriers have been under selection for dog fighting traits, it has also been under complementary selection for stability and tractability with people. Those that showed aggression towards humans in the pit were swiftly culled. Interestingly enough, a few decades ago, the common misconception of the breed used to be that the pit bull was such a people-loving dog that the breed was useless for serious guard work. The breed was considered to be the ‘Nanny’ dog, ideal for looking after children.


    The news media give heavy coverage to some serious dog attacks, which they often attribute to American Pit Bull Terriers though rarely is the breed verified. Impressions of which dogs are most dangerous are implanted by episodic news media stories, though these are not very reliable or valid.


    Attack data are often seriously flawed with respect to collection, reporting, and analysis. Categories used to identify breeds cluster by type, rather than by specific breed, because breed identification is imprecise. The term Pit Bull does not mean American Pit Bull Terrier: it is a generic term that includes all the bull-and-terrier breeds, and sometimes other bull breeds such as boxers, bull mastiffs, American bulldogs etc. Breed identification is seldom verified or consistent and even experts cannot always tell whether a dog is a Pit Bull. More seriously, breed identification often is based upon newspaper accounts.

    Data from New South Wales government for the years 2001 through 2003 list 547 reported dog attacks on people in NSW, with APBTs responsible for 33 (4%) attacks, behind crossbreeds (182, or 32.7%), German Shepherds (63, or 10.4%), Cattle dogs (59, or 8.4%), and Rottweilers (58, or 6.6%). When average severity of bites is considered, APBTs were sixth of the 6 breeds for which there were sufficient data for analysis (NSW government, 2003). According to recent NSW data only 1% of individuals attack in any way a person or other animal in a given year. By the worst case data 90% of its individuals are not recorded to attack a person or animal over their life span.

    Crossbreeds lead the risk of attacks, leaving the APBT well down the lists of absolute numbers of attacks by breed, and the case that it is an especially dangerous dog is not established. The fact that crossbreeds are most likely to attack reflects their numbers in the population and the level of care and supervision they are given.

    On May 20th 2000, a dog of pit bull type killed a 6-year-old child on a school playground in Hamburg. As a result, the authorities of Lower Saxony passed the Niedersaechsische Gefahrtierverordnung (GefTVO) on July 5th, 2000, to avert further danger. This law was created to regulate the keeping of certain breeds of dogs in Lower Saxony. At that time, the authorities assumed that these breeds of dogs represented a particular danger for the population. The law insinuated, without cause, that particular breeds were especially dangerous and divided them into 2 categories: category 1: American Staffordshire terriers, bull terriers, and dogs of the pit bull type. A special permit for keeping dogs of these breeds could be given but only if, among other preconditions, the dogs passed the behavioural test in accordance with the guidelines set out by the Ministry of Nutrition, Agriculture, and Forestry (Niedersaechsisches Ministerium fuer Ernaehrung, Landwirtschaft und Forsten) of Lower Saxony. Dogs in category 2 include: Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler, Staffordshire bull terrier, Bullmastiff, Dogo Argentino, Fila Brasiliero, Caucasian owtscharka, Mastiff, Mastino Espanol, Mastino Napoletano and Tosa inu. Mongrels with dam and/or sire belonging to one of the breeds listed above had to be kept on a leash and wear a muzzle. After successfully passing the temperament test, dogs in Category 2 could be exempted from both these restrictions. In contrast, such an exemption could not be given to a dog belonging to category 1, even after passing a temperament test.

    During a study in Lower Saxony in the temperament of several breeds including the bull terriers, American Staffordshire terriers, pit bull terriers and 11 other breeds, no significant difference in behaviour between breeds was detected. The results show no indication of dangerousness in specific breeds, justification for specific breed lists in the legislation was not shown.

    Although all dogs tested were confronted with stimuli with which aggressive behaviour could consistently be provoked, only 9% of the dogs showed biting with complete approach and earlier threatening behaviour. Of the dogs tested in the temperament test, 95% showed behaviours that were appropriate to the particular situation.

    In another temperament test carried out in the U.S. the results showed that interestingly, the pit bull group had a significantly higher passing proportion (p < 0.05) than all other pure breed groups, except the Sporting and Terrier groups. These groups however, did not have a statistically higher passing proportion (p = 0.78) than the pit bull group. The group that had the highest proportion of breed groups passing the temperament test was the sporting group (85.48%), followed by the pit bull group (84.50%). The groups that failed, with the lowest proportion of dogs passing the temperament test, were the toy (79.01%) and hound groups (77.01%). The groups were compared to determine if there was a significant difference in the proportion of dogs from each group that passed the temperament test. It was found that there were no significant differences between the proportion of dogs passing in the two groups with the highest passing percentages (sporting group and the pit bull group). Both of these breed groups performed significantly better (p > 0.05) than all other groups.

    The Sporting group contains some of the more publicly accepted (as dogs of stable or good temperament) including Golden Retrievers and Labrador Retrievers. More notably, the American Pit Bull Terriers showed significantly higher proportion of dogs passing the test than hounds, herding, working, and toy groups.


    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 1997; CDC, 2003) has indicated that BSL has no merit. They indicate that Dangerous dog laws which focus on individual dogs, regardless of breed, that have exhibited harmful behaviour (e.g., unprovoked attacks on persons or animals) are both logical and enforceable without violating the rights of citizens or declaring individual animals guilty even though the majority are of sound temperament. The CDC indicates that the most logical approach is to place primary responsibility for a dog's behaviour on the owner, rather than the dogs breed. The CDC indicates that legislation and programs focused on ownership responsibility as well as owner and child education are the keys to a safer canine population. The American Veterinary Medical Association (2001) Task Force on Canine Aggression and Human-Canine Interactions also state that Breed Specific Legislation has no merit and that targeting those individual dogs, of any breed, that commit acts of aggression, directly addresses the problem.

    The complex and contributing conditions related to the upbringing of individual dogs are not considered by Breed Specific Legislation and such laws unfairly target the vast majority of individual dogs, which are temperamentally stable. The temperaments of animals are fundamentally and universally acknowledged to be influenced by age, sex, early socialization, early nutrition, training, health and genetics, while BSL only takes one of these factors into account.

  15. #45
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    i love all bully breeds ! pits are no exception..... i always say " dont judge the breed, judge the person holding the lead "

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