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Sleepless Nights 100's of posts read

  1. #1

    Sleepless Nights 100's of posts read

    My 13 week old puppy gets anxious when he is placed in his crate. I am continuing to attempt to make his crate feel like a positive space by providing him a treat when he enters the crate on his own, only give him his Kong (filled with peanut butter) when he is in his crate, feeding him in his crate, and providing lots of toys to play with. I also have a fan near the crate for white noise.

    After several attempts of luring him with food, he will usually enters the crate and appears to be calm as long as I continue to feed him treats. As soon as I stop feeding him treats he runs out of the crate. Also, if he senses that the crate door is closing he will attempt to push is way out. He does not seem to care at all about all of the "fun" items I have placed in his crate at this point and his only focus is on escaping.

    I usually place him in his crate at around 10:15 - 10:45. After closing the door I place a blanket over the crate and walk away to my bedroom without making any fuss (he is in the living room, he was in our bedroom but would start barking every time we moved. Also I have 2 kids who walk loudly past our room to go to the bathroom so this woke him up as well). He usually barks for about 30 minutes before quieting down. I have NEVER let him out of his crate when he is making noise. Thankfully, once he falls asleep he sleeps through the night. I take him out of his crate in the morning before he wakes up to make sure that he doesn't associate barking with being let out.

    A mistake I may have made was placing him in his crate when he became over excited (at the advice of an expensive trainer) and started nipping my kids. However, that was about 3 weeks ago and only happened a handful of times during a 1 week period. Also, I didn't notice it having any positive or negative effect on his association with his crate.



    Last week we did have 2 nights in a row in which he didn't make a peep. Unfortunately, that was short lived

    We thought that providing him too much exercise between 8:30 and 9:00 might be giving him a burst of energy so we tried toning down the energy in our house at night...that didn't work. We thought maybe he needed to burn off energy so we increased his activity between 8:30 and 9:00...that didn't work.

    My wife wants to give up and let him sleep in our bed, which is where he seems most relaxed. I think that sounds like a terrible idea. However, we're going to be spending 3 nights over Thanksgiving at a family members house and I don't know what we're going to do if he 's barking in his crate like he has been.

    PLEASE HELP!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,918
    I chose not to use a crate, although I did try it, my puppy hated it and I raised all my past puppies without crates, so I abandoned the idea after a couple of nights. My breeder suggested that I crate train and put the crate next to me in the bedroom on my end table. That way whenever the puppy got scared at night, I'd be there close by to reassure him.

    I wish I would have tried this method, but honestly, I just like my dogs to be cage free and part of the family. Only restricting them to one room by gate at night until they are house trained. All my dogs have been successfully house trained and happy members of the family. My dog does sleep with us in our bed, but not until he was trust worthy in the house during the night.

    Welcome to the forum, hope you get some good advice from members here who use crates, but I just sympathize with the dogs, who would want to be locked into a crate in the dark or when home alone?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    6,025
    I've always crate trained and had no problems with it. You have to learn to ignore him when he barks, the sooner he realizes you aren't going to let him out he will settle down. Make it non negotiable, tell him bed time, put him in the crate, shut the door and walk away, if he screams he'll stop. No food or water at least two hours before putting him to bed, what doesn't go in doesn't have to come out. I never fed or gave them treats or anything else, just put him to bed and walk away. It will be tough at first but he'll soon realize that crying and barking isn't going to get him what he wants. If you give in on the little things you are going to raise a little tyrant who will not obey and want things his way. A while ago we had another person come in and I warned her she was turning the dog into a tyrant, now she can't do anything with him. He snaps and bites her if she tries to correct him. Not good.

    Use the crate for housebreaking and sleeping only, during the day if you want you can leave the door open and if he chooses to go in and nap he can. He is a baby and is teething so that means anything will be chewed including your fingers and feet. Do not give him an old shoe or sock to chew on, he won't know the difference from an old shoe and a new one. Get him an antler, they are hard and he can chew to his hearts content and not break it. Get one with points on it, not a flat one that can slide down his throat and choke him. You can also wet a cloth and freeze it and give that to him, the cold will feel good on his sore gums but thats only good temporarily as when it melts its of no more use.

    Until you are sure he is completely housebroken and no more accidents in the house you need to confine him to the crate at night and when you go out. Once he's housebroken you can gate him off in another room to give him more room, put him in a room where he can't get into anything or destroy things. As time goes on and he is more reliable he won't need the crate any longer and you can put it away.

    By the way the crate has to be small, just big enough for him to stand, turn around and lie down.

    Your main problem with the crate right now is you are trying to negotiate with him, its not negotiable. Tell him "go to your room" if he doesn't pick him up and put him in it and walk away. Think of him as a little child, neither ever learns anything good on their own, they have to be taught. Be consistent, be fair and don't give in.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    I've always crate trained and had no problems with it. You have to learn to ignore him when he barks, the sooner he realizes you aren't going to let him out he will settle down. Make it non negotiable, tell him bed time, put him in the crate, shut the door and walk away, if he screams he'll stop. No food or water at least two hours before putting him to bed, what doesn't go in doesn't have to come out. I never fed or gave them treats or anything else, just put him to bed and walk away. It will be tough at first but he'll soon realize that crying and barking isn't going to get him what he wants. If you give in on the little things you are going to raise a little tyrant who will not obey and want things his way. A while ago we had another person come in and I warned her she was turning the dog into a tyrant, now she can't do anything with him. He snaps and bites her if she tries to correct him. Not good.

    Use the crate for housebreaking and sleeping only, during the day if you want you can leave the door open and if he chooses to go in and nap he can. He is a baby and is teething so that means anything will be chewed including your fingers and feet. Do not give him an old shoe or sock to chew on, he won't know the difference from an old shoe and a new one. Get him an antler, they are hard and he can chew to his hearts content and not break it. Get one with points on it, not a flat one that can slide down his throat and choke him. You can also wet a cloth and freeze it and give that to him, the cold will feel good on his sore gums but thats only good temporarily as when it melts its of no more use.

    Until you are sure he is completely housebroken and no more accidents in the house you need to confine him to the crate at night and when you go out. Once he's housebroken you can gate him off in another room to give him more room, put him in a room where he can't get into anything or destroy things. As time goes on and he is more reliable he won't need the crate any longer and you can put it away.

    By the way the crate has to be small, just big enough for him to stand, turn around and lie down.

    Your main problem with the crate right now is you are trying to negotiate with him, its not negotiable. Tell him "go to your room" if he doesn't pick him up and put him in it and walk away. Think of him as a little child, neither ever learns anything good on their own, they have to be taught. Be consistent, be fair and don't give in.
    Thanks for the advice! I've been trying hard to make crating a non-negotiable (always putting him in his crate at night, closing the door, never letting him out when he barks). Will you please let me know what choices I am making that shows I am giving in?

    Also, he is doing great with housebreaking, and most days at worst he has 1 accident in the house (and it's usually during heavy play). We let him out of his crate at around 6:30 am, leave for work at 8:30, let him out between 11:30 and 12:30, and then get home from work at 4:00. I've thought about putting his crate in an xpen during the day with the crate door open so he could choose to go in and out of it. However, my biggest worry is by doing that he might choose to begin peeing in the xpen area since he isn't in his crate and not continue to strengthen his bladder.

    Looking forward to everyone's thoughts!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    6,025
    I didn't say you were giving in, I said don't give in. If he's been sleeping and he barks in the night he probably has to go out, take him out, say "outside" and when he gets outside say "go potty", when he goes give him a small treat and praises. He will soon learn the words and let you know when he has to go out. A young dog can only hold it one hour for every month old he is.

    the problem with the xpen is its roomy and he can pee or poop and get away from it. But he is a small dog, you can litter box train him. The idea of confinement is dogs don't usually go where they sleep, thus the small space forces them to either go and lay it in or let you know he has to go out.

    A young puppy should be fed 4 times a day, roughly 2% of his body weight. about 15 minutes after feeding he will have to go out. Don't over feed him, he will grow to fast and it will affect his bone structure. When my pups turn 3-4 months old I start giving them glucosamine, a fish oil pill, a vitamin e pill and a probiotic. I'm going to throw this out there and you can do it or not, I don't spay or neuter until 18 months old. I know the vets say 6 months and I know their reasoning why but I don't do it. Let him grow, he needs those hormones to grow properly plus a dog done young remains puppy like for a long time because of the lack of that hormone they don't mentally mature. When you get a few minutes you can check out pros and cons of early spay and neuter. In fact an intact male is healthier than a neutered one so unless there is a reason to do it I don't neuter my males.

    anyway if you have any more questions don't hesitate to come back, there are many experienced dog owners here and we can and will help you
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    PA USA
    Posts
    2,547
    I've never crated either and if I ever get dogs again (currently I have cats) I never will. I rather my animals roam freely and sleep with us if they want. Please be careful with the peanut butter and check out the ingredients.. Xylitol, a sweetener used in many foods, including peanut butter, yogurt, toothpaste and chewing gum, is safe for humans but potentially deadly for dogs. If ingested, it can cause seizures, liver failure and death, warned one animal hospital, which called xylitol "extremely toxic" to dogs." https://www.thedodo.com/ingrediant-could-be-deadly-dog-1449364385.html
    Also all my pets have been spayed/neutered. Welcome to the forum by the way
    “Save a life and save a stray”

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
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    its a trial and error thing esme, you have to go with what works for you. I crate mine until they are reliable with letting me know they have to go out. The thought of getting up and stepping in a pile of poop is not my idea of a fun time. And I do spay my girls, just not at six months old. The cats are done by five months, a male cat not done by five months will spray, something else I"m not dealing with and I did my siamese at 4 months because she came into heat. She went into heat on a Sunday and I had her at the vets the next day and she was spayed the day after.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

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