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Unstoppable Puller

  1. #1

    Unstoppable Puller

    My dog is addicted to pulling. Literally addicted. Whenever we go on a walk, I go out the door with his leash on, and he immediately starts pulling. Does anyone know how to make this maniac stop pulling? If anyone can offer any suggestions to me, it would be greatly appreciated. Below is some onformation that might help you answer my question.


    He is a beagle/husky mix, or so I think.
    I have tried the EasyWalk Harness, the Gentle Leader, and a normal martingale collar. None have worked. (Also, I would like every other suggestions possible before resorting to a choke chain or a pronged collar. My dog is such a puller these would probably leave holes in this neck or strangle him to death)
    He loves to smell. He is part hound, and will never look me in the eye on a walk, his nose is always to the ground.
    I have been consistently using the Gentle Leader, because it lessens the pulling by about 20%.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    7,217
    first off I would not walk him with a collar, the pulling on the neck can damage his neck and could cause trachea collapse.

    Put a harness on him, when he starts to pull you just stop and turn around, when he gets to the end of the leash it will jerk him back, then bring him back to you and start again, may take a few times but he'll learn, he won't like being jerked back and the pulling will stop
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  3. #3
    I will try that, although I am doubtful it will work with my dog, because he really doesn't seem to care whether he is being jerked or not as long as he is moving forward. Thank you for the suggestion, I will get back to you if it works.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    New Hampshire
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    if that doesn't work when he starts pulling bring him inside, take him out again in a few minutes, if he pulls bring him inside, he'll make the connection. When he realizes that he can't run around outside and behave he has to come in.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  5. #5
    Thank you for your suggestions. I will defiantly try that, that sounds more likely to work. I still have to buy a normal harness, as the only things I own for him is a Gentle Leader, a Easy Walk Harness(which has the leash clip in the front chest), a martingale collar, and a flat collar.

  6. #6
    For some reason, he does better off-leash then on. I just walked him up and down my street, and I make him heel on my left side. When my left side was on the inside of the sidewalk, I dropped the leash and he walked (mostly perfectly) by my side. I was correcting him with a stern word and a quick tug on the leash(when on leash) and a touch to his side and a "No." (when off leash). He seemed to do better off leash, and I stopped several times on the "walk" to put my hand in front of him, which made him lay or sit down.

    I did try your suggestion, and he just pulled a different direction or finished sniffing around the small area his leash would allow him before pulling again. He is very high-energy, and is OBSESSED with smells.

    I also believe that if I were to do this "experiment" somewhere other than his street, he would be much more distractable, especially if there were other dogs.

    We actually adopted him about 9 months ago, and we used to bring him to the dog park until he started to make himself a target to other dogs. He isn't aggressive, but behaves the way a younger brother might to his older brother; bouncy, nippy, bitey, and annoying. We made the desicion to stop bringing him to the dog park after he aggravated a peaceful German Shepherd, who was calmly minding her own business catching balls her owner threw for her. He riles the whole dog park up every time we bring him, and he barks, whines, and lunges at the leash in an effort to get to them. This makes other owners and dogs think he is aggressive, and it has been a hassle to deal with when we walk him in parks nearby.

    The point of that story was to say he is decent at walking off and on leash (with me and only me, not the rest of my family) on my street and my street only. But when there is a dog on our street, he goes insane again. I am starting to think he may just be a puller for the rest of his life.

    I was also using a martingale collar on this walk, because I do not currently own a harness, and the Easy Walk &a Gentle Leader he hates. The Gentle Leader also rides up on his snout when he pulls, squishing his face skin and making his eye squinted. This dog will pull on just about anything.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    New Hampshire
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    7,217
    he's a hound, he's going to follow his nose. I never thought dog parks were a good idea, aside from the obvious problems with other dogs and owners you don't know what diseases or worms or whatever they could be carrying.

    If he's better off leash get a 20 foot leash, that way he can wander at his own pace and you still have control of him if need be
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  8. #8
    Yes, that's probably a better idea. Although we still take him on daily walks around the block, so I am going to have to find a solution eventually.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Hi MDIAM- I share your frustration with pulling. My male Benny is a natural at walking, but my other males Joey and Sugar are entrenched pullers. I tried several things I saw on youtube- making the dog go around when they pull, stopping for a time out every time the dog pulls, or trying to keep the dog focused on me with treats. None of these worked for me, although I admit I did not spend an extended time on any of them. I do not have a background in dog training.

    But I came up with my own helpful, if not complete, solution. I noticed that my dogs were pulling almost in a rhythm. I also noticed that by keeping my eye on them and their muscles, instead of where I am going (within reason), there were clues- both dogs somehow tense in a certain way just before they pull again. So I came up with a variation of the stop-and-go from youtube that worked better.

    Yes, to start out, I give the dog the message that when he pulls, we stop. When we start walking again, it may seem like he starts lunging right away again, but actually there is a slight moment before that and you can see his body about to pull. That's when I moderately, briefly pull or "pulse" the leash. (I always use a regular harness.) The pulse is actually usually enough to abort the lunge momentarily, leaving the dog still walking briskly rather than pulling. The dog keeps moving, but the lunge was postponed for a second. The dog will get ready to lunge again. At just that moment, I pulse the leash again. Only if the dog really obnoxiously pulls do I completely stop, and that happens sometimes, but most of the walk is a quick gait with a pulse every- I don't know- maybe five or ten seconds. Shorter intervals are necessary at the beginning- almost a staccato. At first the pulses are firm, but over time the dog starts to get the idea, and the walk becomes much more manageable, in a rhythm of mild pulses.

    Yes, there are good days and bad days. Sometimes we have to stop in our tracks often. But often/usually we can flow with this rhythm in a reasonable, pleasant way. The secret for me is to keep my eye on the dog. Look for the subtle moment when he is about to pull. Then a moderate pulse instantly. The beginning of the walk is often a little tougher than the rest, as it takes a short time to get into the rhythm. But the key is- for us it's a balance- I will not completely stop you, the dog, unless you lunge obnoxiously, and you will check you pulls each time I pulse.

    It's a weird solution that just evolved while I was trying various things, and I don't know if I'm describing it well. But it has made a big difference for both Joey and Sugar. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than without, and sometimes the overall result is quite good.

    Watch the dog very carefully, notice the right moments just before a pull, and walk with a rhythm of pulses.

    My feeling is that every dog is different, every caregiver is different, and every dog-person relationship is different.

  10. #10
    I will try that. The problem with my dog is that even if we stop completely, he will still pull in every other direction. He is also very distractable, and when I try to get him to sit on a walk, I have to physically push his butt down. He will never look me in the eye or give his full attention on a walk, not even if I praise him or wave food in his face. I agree that some dogs are easier to train to walk nicely then others, and my dog Cooper is a born puller. hope this works, I have tried so many techniques with him, but I have never heard of this before. Thank you for your suggestion.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    USA
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    I've used a smooth choke collar for short training lessons only regarding pulling on the leash, worked very well to help the dog to learn to walk next to you, not tug you the whole way. You also have to feel or see the pull before it happens, to correct it immediately when it does, like DogForce just mentioned. I use a regular leather or nylon collar daily. That's with all training really, know when they are about to do something bad, and be one step ahead in correcting it.

    http://www.petforums.com/showthread.php/440-Tugging-On-The-Leash?highlight=walk+cesar

    http://www.petforums.com/showthread....ght=walk+cesar

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