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All About Dachshunds

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb All About Dachshunds

    I see a lot of Dachshunds at the park, I just mentioned a wire-haired one named Butter in another thread here about dog names, she's a sweetie and the other ones I've petted are also very friendly and nice. When I see them at the vet's office, they usually are loudly barking at some other dog there.




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  3. #3
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    My mom and dad had one for years, she lived to be about 15, but she had a problem with her ears, because they are floppy the outside flap would fill with blood, they had her have surgery but soon after the bandages came off it filled up again, didn't seem to bother her and I had a nurse friend that used to go to their house a couple of times a month and drain them. Vet said it was a common problem with dogs with floppy ears.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  4. #4
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    Oh Linda, that sounds terrible, I never heard of that! Glad it didn't seem to bother her, that's a tough little doggie!

  5. #5
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    the blood would pool at the base of the ear, looked like a squishy bubble, not in the back of the ear, in the front where the ear hangs down. My friend would go over with her needle and drain it, she just sat there and never snapped or growled so I don't think it hurt her and she wasn't shaking her head, it was just a constant problem. After her surgery dad took her back to the vet and he said another surgery wouldn't help that the ears would have to be drained, so my friend did it for them, right up until the day she died she had that problem.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  6. #6
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    SOURCE

    Aural hematomas occur when blood accumulates underneath the skin in the external portion of the ear. A noticeably swollen area develops on the ear. The area is often painful or irritating to the pet.

    Aural hematomas develop when trauma occurs to the ear. Direct trauma or chronic, violent head shaking can break blood vessels in the ear. Broken blood vessels allow blood to accumulate under the skin, forming a hematoma.

    Hematomas are sometimes frustrating to treat, and have a tendency to recur. They are not life threatening, but they often lead to permanent scarring and disfigurement of the ear.

    Symptoms
    Hematomas occur as a swollen, blood-filled area on the ear. The swelling may be fluctuant (soft) or firm, depending on the quantity of blood under the skin. Mild hematomas occupy only a small portion of the ear. In severe hematomas, the entire external portion of the ear may be affected.
    Hematomas often irritate pets, causing head shaking or rubbing and scratching of the affected ear. Some pets develop a posture in which their head is held tilted to the side.
    Risk Factors
    Chronic, repeated head shaking is the leading cause of aural hematomas. Head shaking is most often caused by ear infections or allergic reactions that cause the ear to itch.
    Direct trauma to the ear, such as a bite wound or blunt injury, may also lead to a hematoma.
    Dogs with long, pendulous ears (such as Labrador Retrievers and Cocker Spaniels) are at increased risk for aural hematomas.
    Complications
    Hematomas are irritating and painful. They often recur, or come back, which can be very frustrating. Hematomas often lead to scarring of the ear that may be cosmetically unappealing but not dangerous to the animal's well-being.

    Diagnosis
    Most aural hematomas are easily diagnosed by visual examination of the affected area. A needle may be used to aspirate blood from the ear; this confirms the diagnosis.

    Treatment
    Several options exist for treating hematomas. The method chosen depends on the severity of the hematoma and the clinical judgment of the veterinarian.

    In a relatively simple treatment method, a syringe is used to withdraw accumulated blood from the area. Cortisone may be injected into the ear after the blood is drained. Some veterinarians advocate bandaging the ear after the blood has been withdrawn. However, ear bandages can be inconvenient for owners, and many veterinarians feel that the benefits from bandaging do not outweigh the inconvenience. Aural hematomas often recur after they are drained, and the procedure may have to be repeated several times before it is effective. In some instances, repeated draining fails to lead to permanent resolution of the problem.
    Aural hematomas may also be treated by placing an indwelling drain (called a cannula) into the ear. This allows blood to drain from the area continuously. The cannula typically must be in place for several weeks to be effective. Some pets find cannulas irritating and do not tolerate them. Also, blood leaking from the cannula can cause damage to carpeting and furniture. Most pets must wear an Elizabethan collar (cone collar) while the cannula is in place.
    Surgery is the most aggressive and effective method of treating aural hematomas. In the surgery, blood is drained from the ear and sutures are used to hold the affected area tightly together. This prevents further accumulation of blood. The sutures usually must remain in place for several weeks, and most pets require an Elizabethan collar while the sutures are in place. Although surgery is the most expensive and involved method for treating aural hematomas, it has the lowest failure rate. Significant scarring of the ear occurs following most hematoma surgeries.
    Oral medication with prednisone and antibiotics may be successful for some individuals suffering from aural hematomas.
    After surgery or placement of a cannula, most pets require medication with anti-inflammatory drugs, pain killers, and antibiotics.

    Follow-up
    As has been mentioned, aural hematomas have a high rate of recurrence. To reduce the risk of recurrence, ear infections, ear allergies, and other identifiable causes of head shaking and ear trauma should be treated if present. Proper flea prevention should be employed.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  7. #7
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    What did the vet do during the surgery?
    An inside cat is a safe cat.

  8. #8
    I like those dogs! Thanks for sharing.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CatMom1994 View Post
    What did the vet do during the surgery?

    In the surgery, blood is drained from the ear and sutures are used to hold the affected area tightly together. This prevents further accumulation of blood. The sutures usually must remain in place for several weeks, and most pets require an Elizabethan collar while the sutures are in place. Although surgery is the most expensive and involved method for treating aural hematomas, it has the lowest failure rate. Significant scarring of the ear occurs following most hematoma surgeries.

    my dad's dog did not wear the collar, her ear was bandaged for several weeks and when the bandages came off the the stitches removed the ear filled up with blood again. The surgery was not successful
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  10. #10
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    That is too bad about your dad's dog. In some breeds I love floppy ears.
    An inside cat is a safe cat.

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