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Caring for a bird?

  1. #1

    Caring for a bird?


    I am thinking about getting a bird for a pet. Do any of you have a suggestions? I was thinking some kind that I can teach to say things like " Hi, how are you?" Or "Happy birthday" LOL, it would be fun to have one. Does it take a lot of work to keep them alive? And how long does it take to teach then to talk?

    Thank you for your help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    316
    I used to have a budgie when I was little, it was like my little buddy, but I don't think I'd get a pet bird now. I don't like the idea of them being in a cage, although my budgie was free to fly around and seemed happy and content. If you do get a pet bird you need to give it a lot of attention in order for it to remain tame, otherwise it will become as a bird in the wild.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,268
    Make sure it's a hand tamed young bird. When I was young I made the mistake of buying a large older African Grey Parrot from the pet store and it was not tame at all, I bought a lot of supplies for it and took care of it very well, but he chewed up my hands pretty badly when I tried to work with him. Eventually, I gave him up to a lady who was a big bird lover and just thought he was beautiful (and he was). She didn't care about his not being tamed.

    She had a large aviary in her home with numerous birds, so he went to a good home with an experienced bird lady. I never owned a bird before or after him, I'll just stick with cats and dogs. Like Mechi, I don't like the idea of caging birds either. My parrot had a huge cage and also a large perch with ladder, he pretty much had a whole room to himself, and I'd just go in there to visit him.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,269
    One thing that is very important to remember about having a pet bird is you can't leave the house when it is flying. The animal will surely follow you and find better things to do than go back home. That said, cages obviously are not the answer. You need a bird aviary at the back of your house.
    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  5. #5
    Thank you for the info!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    206
    It is recommend to provide as big of a cage as possible with plenty of enrichment, i.e. numerous perches, hanging toys to interact with, toys that make noises such as bells, as well as mirrors and puzzle feeders etc. Birds like toys they can destroy and pick apart, this is good enrichment for them. Cuttlefish bone can also be provided as a good source of calcium.

    Regarding outdoor housing, consider the climate of your area and the species you wish to get, as it may be entirely inappropriate to expose the bird to that particular climate (you can control temperature and humidity in an indoor setup better than an outdoor one) Sometimes part-time outdoor housing can work but full-time can be too hazardous. An outdoor enclosure also increases risks of predation, theft and escape. Outdoor enclosures require a double door system and should not allow contact with wild birds or their droppings, outdoor housing also increases potential exposure to infectious diseases. If you only plan to get one bird (although at least two is recommended), an outdoor aviary may be a poor choice as the bird will depend on you (and your family) for its social interactions and you should not isolate the bird for the sake of outdoor housing. For indoor birds, 6-8 hours of time outside the enclosure is recommended, making sure to keep windows and doors shut. Take the time to bond with your bird and build a strong rapport, this will help when it comes to training and allow you to put the bird back without issue, some birds (such as mine) were happy to take themselves back into their enclosure in the evening without prompting.

    Sufficient and appropriate lighting should also be provided as birds rely on UV for sight and Calcium homeostasis (e.g. Arcadia Compact bird lamp). And as much as lighting is importing in the day, darkness is important for night to allow for a good sleep.
    Last edited by Cat001; 05-08-2018 at 06:50 AM.
    Feel free to visit my website for information on Reptilian Care
    https://reptile-savvy.weebly.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,268
    Good points about outdoor housing Cat001! An indoor aviary I think is ideal to use if you're not home, of course, your house has to have enough room to dedicate to your bird(s).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Surrey BC
    Posts
    103
    I have had Budgies and a love bird and both lived in large cages with plenty of free time, they need time and patience some birds take more care than others

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