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Declawing is Torture to Your Cat - DON'T DO IT!

  1. #1
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    Thumbs down Declawing is Torture to Your Cat - DON'T DO IT!

    I hold no judgement of those who have already had their cats declawed, from those I've talked to, many regret the decision and were misinformed about the procedure and effect on the cat both physically and mentally. However, I am completely against this inhumane and abusive operation, and would like to share some facts and feelings from the pros. If one person changes their mind, then this post is worth it's weight in gold.



    In many countries, declawing is deemed to be inhumane, abusive, and in some places it is actually illegal. The procedure is extremely painful, and in some cases can cause serious physical side-effects such as post-operation pain, frequently there is hemorrhaging, necrosis or death to surrounding tissue, lameness, walking problems and possible bone spurs or regrowth which would require repeated operations.

    Negative mental and emotional behavior may occur after declawing also. There are instances of shock, personality change, withdrawn behavior, nervousness, fearfulness, aggressiveness (biting as only option), and staying on high places in the home because that is the only means of protection. Extreme pain occurs when the cat needs to use the litterbox after surgery, and some cats who have always been reliable in that area, begin to soil in other places of the house.

    Declawing is not one surgical operation for the cat, but a series of 10 separate painful surgeries. The toenail is not the only thing removed, as many people think. Amputation of the last bone of each toe is necessary. It would be equal to a human getting all 10 fingers cut off at the last knuckle. Removed are all related bones, ligaments, claws, nerves and tendons.

    Please take the time to read these few short pages of information on the realities of declawing your cat before you make this heartless decision. Thanks for being open to receiving all this information, for the future health, happiness, and security of your feline family member. I appreciate your time and thoughtfulness.


    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals...declawing.html
    http://www.declawing.com/

  2. #2
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    That is so sad to think that the poor cats have to o through so much pain and suffering, when having that done, I too am against, any procedure being done unnecessarily, unless it is to save the life of an animal.Important article, thanks Alpha1 for making us aware.

  3. #3
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    Great post, I agree with you totally. Of course. if you think about it, at least the cats are going to a home that they otherwise might not have =/ Doesn't really justify it though. Where I live, shelters make owners sign an agreement that they will not have their cat declawed.

  4. #4
    It's rather sick how people will do this to their cats. Why people can't accept animals as they are dumbfounds me. It merely reflects their own ugly personalities. I can only hope word gets spread around more quickly as to how terrible this procedure is for the cat. Ignorance is no excuse but hopefully some people will educate themselves a little before agreeing to do this.

  5. #5
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    Not all of them are really mean people, lots of them have the procedure done because they need to move into an apartment that insists on declawing. Rather than give up their beloved cats, they take them to the vets. Many folks don't know all the details of the operation, and think is a much simpler removal of the nails. I didn't know all the specifics until recently, and I really wanted to get the word out as to what really happens, so people can make an educated decision in this matter. I think the vets also downplay the severity of the operation, which doesn't help.

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  7. #7
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    Sometimes declawing a cat is necessary if there is a valid medical reason (chronic inflammation, tumors, infections, gangrene, etc).

    But, I would rather see a cat declawed than end up in a shelter. About 1/4 cats are declawed. Many apartments require cats to be declawed and owners get it done instead of dumping their cat at a shelter. I don't agree with apartments making this rule, however. In my opinion, it should be illegal for an apartment owner to tell a cat owner that their animal must be declawed. I think it infringes upon our rights. People who have compromised immune systems, such as those with AIDS, should probably declaw their cats to prevent infection to themselves if scratched. It's better to declaw the cat than to suffer a serious infection. Ideally, cats should keep their claws. If you have HIV/AIDS, you should, ideally, avoid situations that would cause a cat to scratch you, like rough play. In fact, avoiding rough play with cats is probably a good tip for everyone, unless you want to get scratched or bitten. lol A lot of scratches and bites come from cats that are teased or provoked.

    There is always the risk of anesthesia when a cat is declawed, but this can be done at the same time the animal is spayed/neutered. Most cats that are declawed will show tenderness, but most will not show outright discomfort. Unfortunately, most do develop medical complications after declawing. Declawing will change a cat's behavior, too. But, most aren't serious and it's rare for cats to develop biting disorders. Although, most will start to eliminate inappropriately after being declawed. This all has to be taken into account when you choose to declaw. There are medical and behavioral complications. Most declawed cats won't jump up on tables or other surfaces. The unfortunate thing is that behavioral problems are the primary reason cats are given to shelters and declawing will increase behavioral problems. However, this is all anecdotal and there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims.

    In my honest opinion, I believe declawing should be kept legal. But, it should be regulated. But, I believe there should be a ban on declawing wild and exotic cats. But, declawing should be left up to the owners of other exotics. Only veterinarians should perform declawing procedures. But, banning declawing is a very bad idea. However, landlords should not be allowed to tell cat owners they must declaw their cats, as this is infringing upon our rights. I know a lot of people don't like declawing, but it's very widely practiced.

    If you don't want to declaw, you could look into a tendonectomy. If you don't want to use surgery, I recommend behavioral training. Vinyl nail caps are very effective. So is nail trimming.

    My cat, Tsunami, is declawed on her front paws. She had a chronic inflammatory issues with her front feet as a kitten. Her nails were very thick, but extremely fragile. She actually walked on her heels instead of her entire paws because of the pain. She was declawed at 16 weeks and hasn't had a problem since. She has no behavioral problems from the declawing procedure, but it was medically necessary. I don't know if I would have done it if it wasn't. I probably wouldn't have unless she because extremely destructive.

  8. #8
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    Declawing does not keep cats out of shelters. Actually, declawing causes so many behavior problems that many cats are dumped afterwards. Some are brought to shelters. Many are just kicked out the door. In addtion people who choose to declaw, especially if they understand what declawing actually is and go ahead with it anyway, in general seem to place a lot less value on the cat, and often dump the cat anyway, for lame reasons.

    Medically necessary is one thing, but I would advise anyone with a vet saying such a thing to seek several other opinions first. I'm glad Tsumani seems to do okay with it, but don't kid yourself. She has pain, in her feet and in her back. Maybe less than she had with her condition. At 16 weeks, seems like more could have been tried to treat it first. As for "extremely destructive" that is never, EVER, a reason to declaw. Cats can be trained.

    Thankfully the movement is growing to educate people about what declawing really is. If vets would give full disclosure instead of looking at dollar signs, probably many cats would be saved from going through this hideous unnecessary mutilation. 10 amputations, ten toes cut off, including bone, tendon, ligaments and nerves. How can anyone agree to it? It boggles my mind.

    They have to relearn how to walk. There is constant strain on the back and legs, forever. And, without claws, they can't stretch properly, even to ease that strain. Ever. Hopefully you have learned how to massage Tsunami and help her stretch her back and legs.

  9. #9
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    Thumbs down Declawing Can Emotionally Scar Your Cat for Life

    More HERE.


    • Declawing of cats continues to be a hotly debated topic, primarily because many people continue to believe the procedure is nothing more than a simple, painless, permanent nail trim – which couldn’t be further from the truth
    • A more precise name for declawing is “de-toeing.” The procedure removes not only the claws, but also the bones, nerves, joint capsule, collateral ligaments and the extensor or flexor tendons
    • Declawing frequently results in undesirable behavioral and emotional changes in cats that can last a lifetime. Most of these changes are pain-related
    • An alternative to declawing your cat is to provide appropriate scratching surfaces around your home, and taking steps to encourage kitty to use them
    • Other alternatives include regular nail trims and using deterrents to protect your floors and furnishings

  10. #10
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    Surgery in itself is extremely dangerous to cats.I've actually heard of situations with cats dying from the stress of surgery,and this is not at all uncommon.If this torture was done to humans it would be considered illegal,but no since humans are so incredibly selfish and ignorant it's completely fine in some countries!

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  12. #12
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    Declawing is now illegal in Denver, Co.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by annstaub View Post
    Great post, I agree with you totally. Of course. if you think about it, at least the cats are going to a home that they otherwise might not have =/ Doesn't really justify it though. Where I live, shelters make owners sign an agreement that they will not have their cat declawed.
    Sadly this is often the case and there is nothing people can do about it. If someone is in that situation and would otherwise be a wonderful cat parent, I could never say no, you can't have a cat.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha1 View Post
    Not all of them are really mean people, lots of them have the procedure done because they need to move into an apartment that insists on declawing. Rather than give up their beloved cats, they take them to the vets. Many folks don't know all the details of the operation, and think is a much simpler removal of the nails. I didn't know all the specifics until recently, and I really wanted to get the word out as to what really happens, so people can make an educated decision in this matter. I think the vets also downplay the severity of the operation, which doesn't help.
    It is not just apartments. Adults living with their parents sometimes have no say on the matter because, you know, parent rules. Such situations should not exist. I think it is stupid that any cat lover must choose having a declawed cat or no cat. There definitely needs to be more education about the surgery. However, there will always be ignorant people who don't care.

    Wilbur's foster mom talked to her vet about the issue for him. The vet told her it is better to have a declawed cat inside than an outdoor (homeless) cat. He uses a laser procedure to declaw that, she explained to me, "cauterizes as it cuts" so that there is less blood loss and faster healing time. I was not aware that method also shortens the toes like a standard onychectomy.

    Someone else I volunteered with at the shelter told me she canceled a declawing appointment after someone told her what the surgery actually is. Her other cat was already declawed and a polydactyl.
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

  15. #15
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    To clarify, I don't like declawing. Given a choice, I could never make myself do it. I learned the hard way it affects a cat's ability and willingness to jump on my lap or bed. However, a side effect is the kitty can't jump on kitchen counters either. I am sure that would be appetizing to some people.

    If declawing was illegal everywhere, would fewer people adopt cats?
    Rescued is my favorite breed. Don't shop, adopt!

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