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Parvo in dogs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    7,313

    Parvo in dogs

    Parvo is a highly contagious virus. It causes an infectious gastrointestinal (GI) illness in puppies and young dogs, and without treatment, it is potentially deadly.

    Part of what makes the virus so dangerous is the ease with which it is spread through the canine population. The virus spreads either by direct contact with an infected dog, or through feces, and an infected dog can begin shedding the virus four-to-five days after exposure — often before the dog starts exhibiting any clinical signs of infection. The dog will continue to shed the virus while he is sick and for up to 10 days after he has recovered. This means that accurate diagnosis and quarantine are essential for the health of your dog and of other dogs, as well.


    What Dogs Are Most at Risk for Parvo?

    Young dogs between six weeks and six months old, unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated dogs are most at risk for contracting parvo. German Shepherd Dogs, Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, English Springer Spaniels, and American Staffordshire Terriers also have an increased risk of contracting the parvovirus, although scientists are not entirely sure why these dog breeds are at a higher risk than others.

    Puppies are born with antibodies from their mothers. As these antibodies fade, however, it is up to owners to make sure that the puppies receive a course of parvo vaccinations. The stress of weaning and a secondary parasite or infection, along with parvo, can lead to a more severe case of parvo, which is why it is very important to talk to your vet about the proper care for puppies and pregnant bitches.

    What Causes Parvo in Dogs?

    The canine parvovirus causes parvo in dogs, and it can be transmitted in two ways. The first is by direct contact through the nose and mouth with infected poop, which can happen when a dog sniffs or licks a surface or another dog that has been contaminated with feces. Since puppies explore their world through smell and love to mouth things, it is easy to see how a curious puppy could contract the parvovirus.


    The second method of transmission is through indirect contact. The virus can survive on clothing, equipment, on human skin, and in the environment. Indirect transmission occurs when a puppy comes into contact with a contaminated person, object, or environment.

    The parvovirus is a particularly resilient virus. It can survive indoors at room temperature for at least two months and is resistant to many commonly used cleaners and disinfectants. Outdoors, the parvovirus can survive for months, and even years, if protected from direct sunlight. This is why hospital quarantine of the infected dog and proper cleanup of the environment are especially important.

    Symptoms of Parvo in Dogs

    Every dog owner and breeder should know the symptoms of parvo in dogs. The most common symptoms are:

    Severe, bloody diarrhea
    Lethargy
    Anorexia
    Fever
    Vomiting
    Weight loss
    Weakness
    Depression


    Dehydration

    Any or all of these symptoms merit a call to your veterinarian. Even if parvo is not the cause, the symptoms could be the result of another illness that requires veterinary attention.

    Parvo Treatment

    If you suspect that your dog has parvo, he needs immediate veterinary attention. Parvo is a potentially fatal virus that requires intensive care, and the sooner your canine is diagnosed the better. Your vet will most likely recommend hospitalizing your dog in an isolation ward, where he will offer supportive care and monitor your dog for secondary infections.

    Most puppies that survive the first 3-to-4 days will make a complete recovery, which usually takes around one week. Your vet will walk you through the recovery process and tailor a recovery plan best suited to your puppy’s needs.

    Parvo Prevention

    Parvo is a preventable disease, but even vaccinated dogs are not 100% protected from the virus.

    Vaccines for the parvovirus are recommended for all puppies - this is one of the few vaccines that I still advise you give. I suggest a minimum of 2 vaccines, at 8 weeks then again at 12 weeks.

    source: The american kennel club
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    USA
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    1,987
    Thanks for sharing all this Linda! You and Dog Force share lots of great things!

Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

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