Results 1 to 8 of 8

My malamute is becoming aggressive

  1. #1

    My malamute is becoming aggressive

    I have a ten month old alaskan malamute. The previous owner didn't take care of him or do any training. So for the past 6 months I have worked with him and things have gone well until now. The past few months my dog was attacked numerous times by my neighbors dogs while him and I were out walking. So now I feel that he has become leash aggressive, because he associates our walks and the leash with fear it might happen.

    Where I live its hard to get a trainer to come out here because I live in the middle of no where. I tried to distract him on our walks. I know treating in walks inst the best idea, but when I would see him act out I would say a command an have him follow through an treat him. It worked at first but then he just couldn't stop biting me. He has manage to leave multiple bruises on me and basically scare me to death sometimes. I was suggested to get a vibrating collar, but I really have no clue about those and rather not unless I get a way better knowledge about the product. Does anyone have tips that could help. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,885
    First thing I have to ask...has he been neutered? Malamutes are a VERY dominant breed of dog, and when they are not fixed, aggression is more likely when not properly trained. They need strong "alpha" owners to lead them, and give them boundaries. Don't train with aggression or yelling, that will never work with any dog. He needs to trust you, not fear you (nor you, him). They NEED to be socialized with other pets and humans.

    I'm so sorry to hear that your neighbor's dogs attacked him while on a leash with you. Are these dogs running loose, and what breed are they? Are they males that are intact? If there was even one attack on my dog, I'd be having a serious conversation with those neighbors, and make sure they'd be contained in the yard, and it would never happen again.

    I don't recommend an electronic collar, I have used them for puppy training, as a reminder in unfamiliar areas not to go too far away from me. They are very inconvenient to use, and the remote cannot fall into anyone's hands that is irresponsible, and may shock the dog as punishment, etc.

    Once your neighbors dogs are taken care of, and your dog no longer fears any threats, you can continue to work with him. He looks like a beautiful boy, I had a chocolate colored Alaskan Malamute male many years ago. You must be in charge of the dog, in control, and he must see you as his leader and guardian.

    He can never be permitted to bite you, he needs to be corrected and learn that that type of behavior is not acceptable. Have a large rawhide bone around, and when you correct him, give the bone and tell him to chew that. I may have a few suggestions, please tell me more about him first. How much exercise is he getting daily? Is he being socialized at all with other dogs and people? Where does he spend most of the day and night?

    Welcome to the forum. I think you can have a very sweet pet with a bit of work on your part, and any other family members. Are there kids or other pets at home? If so, how is he with them? I know, a lot of questions, but they're necessary for consideration in what may help.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanual Kant~



  3. #3
    No, my vet said it would better to wait till he was a year old? My dog is socialized with other dogs, although yes he has had bad experiences with being attacked he gets along very well with others, even while bringing to stores he loves people an dogs.

    The dogs were running loose and they were pitbulls. As for the gender I couldn't tell you. I haven't paid attention to it. Where I live if I were to go on someone property the likely hood of being shot would be high especially with who the owners were. Thankfully after me calling an complaining an making another report animal control made them sign over the dogs.

    I don't want the shock color cause I don't want to by mistake miss the mark when I should shock him an then he is confused what he was shocked for. Its just a waste of money in my opinion.
    I have been working with him since the dogs are gone, but he has is times. What Im trying to do is when he acts up on walks I bring him in the house an tell him to sit. So he associates his craziness with having a some what of a time out. Once he calms down we go outside again.

    I have tried the whole do an reward type. Its just he wants it his way. I make sure i stand my ground, but he just wants to chew on me an show me he is boss.
    My dog is 10 months old like I said and a ball of love. He is protective of me a little more because I am with pretty much at all times. Im slightly disabled so I am home majority the time if not he is usually with me out in the car. My fiance and him are close as well an he does attack my fiance but not as much, because he lets him know he is the boss.

    The previous owner of my dog didnt treat my dog well so I retrained him, but he has been stepping out of bounds a bit. His exercise might be what is causing him to lash out a bit more. I know they need a lot. The dogs were stopping me from taking him on walks because they would be out in the street. I dont have a fenced in yard which complicates it as well. He gets a lot of walks through the day but for sure needs more run time.

    Most of the day he is with me taking walks, or just laying around napping. At night time he usually sleeps near my bed until my fiance and I are settled in bed, than he goes into his crate and sleeps for the night. He is a really good dog, an he listens most of the time. He just needs to learn the no jump and bite.
    I heard about the gentle leader? Have any opinion on that?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,885
    I'm glad those dogs are no longer a threat. When I had my Malamute, we got him a dog-pack, it slings over the back and has 2 pockets at the side to hold things in. http://www.petedge.com/product/Guard...ries/55315.uts They are working dogs, and they seem to take on a different attitude when carrying some weight...they actually appear to like it, it has a calming effect. Never used the gentle leader, but here's a past thread about it...http://www.petforums.com/f12/dog-collars-pullers-1472/
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanual Kant~



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    96
    I'm glad the neighbor dog issues are resolved, but in the future, try carrying a decent sized squirt gun full of water and shoot the on-coming dogs with it.

    I have had "friendly" dogs rush my horses many times down thru the years, when road riding. It didn't take me long to teach the horses to "rush" back but I always carried a squirt gun full of water to help in the attack. If a dog's owner happened to standing on the porch doing nothing but watching, I let them know there is a leash law, my squirt gun was nothing but water and if my horse trampled their dog -- too bad, ending up in wheel chair because of somebody's unruly dog was not on my list of things to do.

    That won't resolve the other issues but it is a protection measure in case more loose dogs appear out of nowhere.

    I would ask the vet why he wants to wait until the dog is a year old? I've never heard of such a thing. Is it something to do with this breed?

    I have had Rottweilers for 30+ years - they are a very strong-willed/dominant dog. When I was teaching them what "no" means, they were always asking "why?" or "so what?" lol lol They were all males with a female instructor (me), so they were adamant about dominance. Sometimes the "because I'm the boss and I say so" has to be a lot more stern than we want it to be --- even if it hurts us way more than it hurts them.

    It's like spanking our children. We get a lump in our throat at spanking time but, occasionally, it's got to be done in a fair manner and letting the punishment fit the crime.

  6. #6
    Thanks Alpha!
    I never expected these dogs to approach to be honest. That's why I was never protected. Now I know. The dog owners don't care and their was a bigger is as to they don't speak english. Well they do, but pretend not to.
    As for the vet, they said since he is a malamute they tend to stay immature longer? He tried to explain that its better to let all his hormones go through his body to make sure he gets to his full size an to let him fully mature.
    I have to say since I been doing the if yo act up we go inside idea, he has been getting better. He just gets so excited that he doesn't want to go inside an he wants to go find dogs. That's were the neutering comes in, because he wants the dogs in heat.
    Im praying things work and I know with being direct an letting him know this is how it goes you listen to me it should. I baby him, which I know I shouldn't but he is really close to me. He is my therapy dog. So its just I think I let it go so now he thinks IM his. only time will tell

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by Lissax3 View Post
    Thanks Alpha!
    I never expected these dogs to approach to be honest. That's why I was never protected. Now I know. The dog owners don't care and their was a bigger is as to they don't speak english. Well they do, but pretend not to.
    As for the vet, they said since he is a malamute they tend to stay immature longer? He tried to explain that its better to let all his hormones go through his body to make sure he gets to his full size an to let him fully mature.
    I have to say since I been doing the if yo act up we go inside idea, he has been getting better. He just gets so excited that he doesn't want to go inside an he wants to go find dogs. That's were the neutering comes in, because he wants the dogs in heat.
    Im praying things work and I know with being direct an letting him know this is how it goes you listen to me it should. I baby him, which I know I shouldn't but he is really close to me. He is my therapy dog. So its just I think I let it go so now he thinks IM his. only time will tell
    That's interesting what the vet said - something I would not have thought about.

    Nothing wrong with babying --- the hardest thing I had to do was walk away after one of my Rott's needed strong discipline. It would break my heart; thankfully those times were few and when the dogs were all young and learning. It got to where I all I had to say was "don't you do that" with the voice to match - lol lol lol

    You're on the right track, you just needed to hear from others that have dogs with strong personalities

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,885
    I don't agree with the one year age either, here's a breeder/trainer that recommends 6 months old. http://lonestaralaskanmalamutes.com/...ngandmore.html . I was young when I had my malamute, and we did not neuter him. Since then I've learned, and spay/neuter all of my dogs.

    It's hard not to baby them, they are just like little (or big) stuffed toys...but, you have to keep in mind the goal of a well-mannered pet. They get spoiled easily and before you know it, they are dominating the household, making their own rules, demanding to be fed when they want to, staying up on the couch until they feel like getting off, etc.

    My Standard Schnauzer is very dominant, and he's almost 70 pounds. If I'm not firm with him, he will make me his bitch, lol. He's over ten years old now, and he is a very good, loving and loyal dog...but the dominant breeds need to know who is the pack leader, not with aggression or threats on the part of the master, but with firm, confident, assertive training.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanual Kant~



Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

Similar Threads

  1. Not All Aggressive/Dominant Issues are What They Seem
    By haopee in forum Dog Training and Behavior
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-30-2012, 06:12 PM
  2. great Pyrenees aggressive help
    By CarlyAnne91 in forum Dog Training and Behavior
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-07-2012, 03:08 PM
  3. What to do with an aggressive dog?
    By mrswindupbird in forum Dog Training and Behavior
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-08-2012, 02:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Family & Health Forums: Mom Forum - Senior Forums - Health Forum - Low Carb Forum