Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Biting Puppy

  1. #1

    Biting Puppy


    ...
    Last edited by afrye203; 08-09-2013 at 07:49 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    274
    As a mom, I can't see why your children were left alone with a dog at all, especially after the first bite. If you are not in the room watching the dog, she needs to be crated. All your counters need to be cleaned off and the trash can needs a lid. Feed her twice a day in her crate and make her sit or lay before giving it to her. After she starts respecting you and working for her food, have your children give her the food bowl. After some time goes by of this, try feeding her outside the crate. While eating, step between the bowl and the dog. Have her sit again before moving and letting her finish her meal. Do NOT let your children try this.

  3. #3
    the dog got into the trash can while my daughter was throwing something away (it is under our sink) and on the counter were pizza boxes. they are never alone with her...we were all in the house. she is not aggressive over her food only people food.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,918
    ...where's your post afrye??

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    274
    You can see how I can to the conclusion about your children being alone with the dog. You said in your original post that you told the kids to come get you next time. That indicates to me that you were not there when the dog bit them. You need to be in the room(not just the house) watching the dog or she needs to be crated. Keep all people food put away and do not allow the dog to have any.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Alabama
    Posts
    348
    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha1 View Post
    ...where's your post afrye??
    It was here last night, Alpha, so she must have deleted it now. It says it was edited, and she is the only one that can edit her post. She apparently posted after the first post, and then either got her feelings hurt, or was somehow upset by the dialogue that she and NC were having, would be my guess. I hope that she did not leave the group ?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,918
    Hopefully not, NClady is a caring member with lots of real-life pet experience, good advice and reasonable opinions. I thought that's what happened with the post, but was hoping that Afrye would pop in and comment.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    274
    I certainly never intended to run anyone off. I admit I can be a little rough around the edge especially when it comes to a child or animal's safety, as we have seen with the epileptic puppy post. Sorry if that is what happened here, but I see no excuse for leaving a dog alone with children especially after that dog has bitten one in the face and left a scar. Thank you, alpha

  9. #9
    Nope, didn't run me off....I am really unfamiliar with this site and when I went in to add more details I accidentally deleted it and since no one else replied, didn't feel the need to fill it back in. What happened was my dog is a 10 month black lab/beagle mix and she bit my 6 yro daughter on the leg while putting trash in the trash can (because the dog wanted the food in the can) and about a month later she bit my 7 yro son on the face because there were pizza boxes on the counter and he was approaching her to pet her (she growled at him and then bit his face within seconds)...

    As far as being ALONE goes our entire family was in the house, but not in the same room (we were in the living room). After the first bite we had been keeping May on the leash outside and in her crate a LOT but I felt bad for her...it is completely unrealistic to expect someone to literally follow their dog around into each room they go into. Plus since the first bite didn't break skin (just left a bruise) I was not completely devoid of trust for our pup.

    Since she bit my son on the face she has been outside or in her crate at all times, I can not trust her and I can't be everywhere at once especially with three small kids (ages 7,6,3). At this point I need to know what to do with her because if I take her to the pound I had heard that they will put her down because of the biting. I don't want that to happen, but I also do not want her to live her life in the crate or on the leash. It seems so unfair BUT I can NOT risk my kids getting bit again.

  10. #10
    I should also mention she has shown aggression since she was around 3 months old but we figured it was a puppy thing she would grow out of. We are first time dog owners and followed a variety of different training methods with her (she is VERY obedient and really only struggles with jumping on people when she gets excited).

    But the aggression would be random (telling her to get off the bed, she would freeze and growl because she didn't want to) or if she was under the kids beds and we would call her out and she would stay under there growling and eventually we would pull her out by her collar.

    Every time she showed aggression we would crate her (per one dog training book we read) and so those types of incidents stopped happening. I just didn't realize it meant she is an aggressive dog. And frankly as first time dog owners we are not equipped to handle her.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    South Wales, UK
    Posts
    850
    Have you tried contacting local rescues to see if they will take her from you and re-home her? It is important that they are strictly no-kill and to be honest, I probably wouldn't say she's bitten as they are likely to no take her. I would just say she has shown some aggressive tendencies and you aren't able to help her. This pup needs & deserves consistent training and behaviour help, if you aren't able to offer her that then the best thing you can do is find a rescue organisation that can.

    You say it is completely unrealistic to expect someone to follow their dog from room to room every time they move - what should actually happen is the dog should be confined to ONE room, the room you use most in the day (i.e. the living room) and should be crated whenever YOU leave that room. As NClady has said, a dog that has bitten should never be left alone with children.

    If you aren't able to a find a rescue to help, maybe you could find a local positive reinforcement training class or instructor in your area to help you.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,918
    Quote Originally Posted by afrye203 View Post
    What happened was my dog is a 10 month black lab/beagle mix and she bit my 6 yro daughter on the leg while putting trash in the trash can (because the dog wanted the food in the can) and about a month later she bit my 7 yro son on the face because there were pizza boxes on the counter and he was approaching her to pet her (she growled at him and then bit his face within seconds)...

    Since she bit my son on the face she has been outside or in her crate at all times, I can not trust her and I can't be everywhere at once especially with three small kids (ages 7,6,3). At this point I need to know what to do with her because if I take her to the pound I had heard that they will put her down because of the biting. I don't want that to happen, but I also do not want her to live her life in the crate or on the leash. It seems so unfair BUT I can NOT risk my kids getting bit again.
    Welcome to the forum Afrye! It seems like your girl has already taken the dominant position of pack leader or alpha of all those in the home. This behavior can be corrected with constant work and training involving all family members. Has she been spayed? Sometimes hormones play a part in undesirable behavior.

    She probably has never been firmly (and gently) dealt with when she tries to get her way. She's likely experienced getting her food treats, or staying on the furniture, etc. when she growls, threatens or bites. She needs to be trained step by step to respect all family members and act gently around the children. With adequate exercise, long walks on a 6 foot lead, where you are leading her, and not the other way around, she can start to get the physical and mental stimulation needed for a well-rounded dog.

    She should be made to sit, before giving her any food at all. If feeding her something by hand, you need to put your hand to her mouth first, not let her grab the treat...and calmly and confidently tell her 'easy'. Never give her anything when she demands it or behaves aggressively, that's just rewarding the behavior.

    Quote Originally Posted by afrye203 View Post
    I should also mention she has shown aggression since she was around 3 months old but we figured it was a puppy thing she would grow out of. We are first time dog owners and followed a variety of different training methods with her (she is VERY obedient and really only struggles with jumping on people when she gets excited).

    But the aggression would be random (telling her to get off the bed, she would freeze and growl because she didn't want to) or if she was under the kids beds and we would call her out and she would stay under there growling and eventually we would pull her out by her collar.

    Every time she showed aggression we would crate her (per one dog training book we read) and so those types of incidents stopped happening. I just didn't realize it meant she is an aggressive dog. And frankly as first time dog owners we are not equipped to handle her.
    Crating her or just tying her up outside for so many hours a day is not helping the situation at all. It is just punishment, without guidance to do what's right, and training to learn how to act. IMO, you're actually making her more aggressive, and manipulative of people. She will resent being punished, and not understand the real reasons why.

    I understand your dilemma, and my heart goes out to you. Honestly, with 3 little ones at home, and having a dominant dog as your first dog, things don't look promising at all. Even if you had another adult willing to work with the dog, everyone, including your children would have to actively participate in the process.

    I usually would recommend training the dog rather than giving it away, but in your case, time is of the essence, and I'm concerned that the dog will become older, remain a biter, and be euthanized by someone down the line. Not fair that she doesn't get a chance at a normal life in someone's home.

    You can make an active effort to rehome her, to someone who knows all of her issues, and has the time to devote in giving her the attention, exercise and training that is so necessary. Perhaps you know someone, without children, who will foster her in the interim, until a loving forever home for her can be found.

    If you can't rehome in a timely fashion, then, as already mentioned by Goldfinch, you should take her to a NO-KILL shelter. It must be a no-kill shelter, where they will evaluate and train the dog enough for life in a new home. I don't think she's a mean dog at all, just needs the proper guidelines that can be given to her from those who are experienced in working with dogs.

    Good luck, hope you do what's best for the dog and your family. It's a hard decision, but it's one that must be made with a clear mind...reviewing all the pros and cons, and realities of keeping the dog with immediate re-training. Please let us know if you have any more questions, or need any advice at all on your situation, we're happy to help if we can.

  13. #13
    Thank you for the tips Alpha! After a lot of talking with my family and hours of watching the Dog Whisperer and doing TONS of research online we have established that we have a dominance issue with our pup. She doesn't respect us as boss, she sees it as she is in charge. Which explains why I can't take her for a walk without her running all over and pulling like crazy.

    This morning we spent an hour walking the way Cesar suggests with the leash at the top and stopping until she is behind me and I was using a strong clear firm mind thinking over and over that I AM ALPHA. I am so HaPPY to say that by the end our walk she was walking behind me, but let me tell you she was fighting submitting big time. She is very strong willed.

    Anyway we are going to be working hard core to train our pup to respect my husband and I and the children as boss. I am aware that I still can't leave her alone with the kids and am working on making her a "room" of her own so she has somewhere she can be when I am too busy to make sure what she is doing.

    Thanks again for the tips. We love our girl and really want what is best for her and for us.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,918
    I'm sooo happy you have the time to work with her , I wasn't certain about that. It's great that you watch Cesar and get some ideas there. I have done "the walk" with my dog in the past, and the results were amazing.

    The next time we went for the walk, he didn't try to walk ahead at all, he was next to me or slightly behind. Once he knew he wasn't to sniff around and lollygag, he walked nicely and followed my lead. I let him do his sniffing and business in a grassy area with trees, then we continued on our walk.

    He seemed to show me more respect in the house, and listen better to me also. I did the whole confidence thing, held my head high, chest out, relaxed and confident, acted as the leader...and he responded in kind.

    Guess I wasn't sure either if you had your husband in the home either, so it's wonderful if he hops on board with this training. She is dominant, but she can learn that the people in the house make the rules and are in charge of her. Even the kids can (and should), firmly and gently tell her to sit before they give her any treats. If she starts to get rough or grab, then she needs immediate correction...in the moment...that's the most effective, with a firm 'no'.

    Kudos for taking on the challenge, and the best of luck to you. I think she'll be a wonderful dog once she learns some manners.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Alabama
    Posts
    348
    Afrye, I am happy to hear that you are making progress with your puppy, and since she is still young, she will probably learn pretty easily that you are the alpha in the pack, and she is not it.
    I think that animals do that pretty easily, especially with young children. When my kids were little, we had a gentle milk goat, but one day when Robin went up close to her, that goat just turned and butted her like she did the baby goats, and I realized that this was how she looked at the children, as well. She was not mean in the least, just doing what a nanny goat does, but Robin could have been hurt, so we had to be careful with the goat, and she stayed away from her after that.

    I wonder if getting a muzzle for your dog, which would stop her from biting, might help you with training her not to snap at the children. She would "lose her power", so to speak. It would only be used when she was at liberty in the house and the kids were there. She would not be able to steal people food either.
    It would also protect the children from being bitten, so they can develop more confidence being around her. I imagine they are showing fear of her at this point, so she will still be thinking herself as above them in status. If she can't bite, then she loses that status pretty much.

    One of the things they suggest with an aggressive horse is to tie up one foot, and then the horse is at a disadvantage, and becomes more submissive, and this would be a similar method with your dog.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

Similar Threads

  1. How to Get Your Budgie to Stop Biting!
    By megansbudgie in forum Birds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-03-2013, 09:56 AM
  2. Daschund Puppy is Biting My Cat
    By daschunddaddy in forum Dog General
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-21-2013, 09:05 PM
  3. biting and trash digging
    By mjw1201 in forum Cat Training and Behavior
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-15-2012, 10:58 AM
  4. Cat Biting - What To Do?
    By Alpha1 in forum Cat Training and Behavior
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-08-2012, 09:32 AM
  5. Cat Swiping/Biting
    By ciaobby in forum Cat Training and Behavior
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-28-2012, 03:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Family & Health Forums: Mom Forum - Senior Forums - Health Forum - Low Carb Forum