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Shelter dogs come with too much baggage and behavior problems, do you agree?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    it may be more work to work with a dog with issues but with time, patience and love any dog can be retrained
    Well said.

  2. #17
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    True, a rescue dog is an unknown package. You don't know what they've been through i.e. abuse and they can be anxious, or excitable to the point of unruliness, in a new home.

    But with love and patience, and a quiet spirit where appropriate to keep them calm, they can be retrained and become very loving, loyal friends and companions.

    It is not their fault they ended up in a shelter. They deserve a second chance at happiness.

  3. #18
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    some people get a dog on a whim, then then either don't know how to train or can't be bothered and the dog becomes a problem they are dumped in a shelter. Deciding to get a dog should be a lifetime commitment. But something like 70% of dogs never stay in their original home. For whatever reason they are bounced from home to home and then put in shelters to be someone else's problem. The number of animals that die in shelters is astronomical. If people would only stop and think what they are doing and not get an animal if you aren't ready to devote a lifetime to its care then don't get one. People create their own problems, they may just tie it out and it becomes aggressive out of boredom or barks all the time and neighbors complain then the dog has to go. They create the problems then dump them on someone else to deal with. They aren't doing this animal any favors and as usual its the animal that pays the ultimate price.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  4. #19
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    don't you just love this excuse "I'm having a baby, don't know how the dog will react to a an infant so I'm looking to rehome it" The dog hasn't even done anything yet and already its being thrown out. "or the dog got to big" And how big did you think a german shepherd would be? "or the yard is to small, did the yard get smaller? Any excuse will do for someone that tires of their pet and wants to get rid of it. SHAME on them!
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  5. #20
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    It depends on the dog that you rescue. Most issues can be worked out, if you have patience. Winston is a shelter dog. His 'issues' that sent him to the pound, was he was cocking his leg up on walls. he was then sent outside, and then became severely matted and covered with fleas. This was unacceptable to the person(s) who owned him. I get him, then had him neutered. He is an extremely friendly dog, that loves to cuddle. The way I see it, if you want an animal bad enough, you will work with it.

  6. #21
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    good for you, unfortunately not everyone thinks like that, people create their own problems then when the dog develops issues out they go. Dogs do not self train, they have to be taught but someone that doesn't know anything can't teach anything else.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  7. #22
    i do not believe rescue/shelter dogs are inherently 'bad'. there are horror stories, sure, but i have also heard my share of tragedies of pups from breeders. it can be impossible to know how a puppy was reared. also, a shelter/rescue adopting out animals that are known to be aggressive or overly unhealthy does the adoption service no good. a HUGE problem with dog owners is the fact that so few pay enough attention to the critical period of development in pups, and there are breed specific differences that often go ignored, leading to some behavior problems are misdiagnosed. understanding breed-specific behavior and the motor patterns associated with that breed help to determine training methods and outlets for internal drives(that can manifest as behavioral issues if not properly addressed).
    In my opinion, the benefit to society and to dogs of rescue/adoption far outweighs the time and patience required to correct mildly aberrant behavior, and my hat off to those dedicated and doing incredible work with dogs(often with such limited resources)in rescue work.

  8. #23
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    I think that there will always be training necessary, regardless of whether a person gets a brand new puppy, or an adult dog. Not all dogs that end up at the dog pound were taken there because they had problems and the owner didn't want them.
    Some dogs simply got out of the yard , and were then captured by animal control before they could get back home.

    Animal control often even watches for "sellable" dogs to capture.
    When my daughter was little, we got her a beautiful part blue heeler/part samoyed that was at the dog pound. Robin and Casey were inseparable. He lived and slept with her, and happily followed along when she went horseback riding on her pony.
    He was a good jumper, and when the school bus came to bring Robin home, he would then jump out of the fenced yard, and run to the school bus to meet her and walk her back to the house. This happened every day. One day, the AC truck was there, and as soon as Casey jumped out to meet Robin at the bus, they looped him and dragged him away right in front of my crying daughter !
    Now, if they were that diligent at catching dogs, that would be one thing, but there were loose dogs that didn't stay in their yards, and they ran the streets day and night, and AC didn't bother with them, just the dogs that looked purebred, or at least a cute mix of some kind.
    So, definitely, not every dog that gets sold from the pound or a rescue has been taken there because he lacks training of some sort.

  9. #24
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    I completely disagree most of the shelter dogs I have gotten have been the best dogs you could ever have, while getting a puppy may be easier you also have to account for potty training and such which can take a long time depending on the breed. So in some cases it may be easier to get a dog from the shelter you can usually spot behavioral issues at the shelter

  10. #25
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    you aren't always able to spot problems while the dog is in a shelter. They are in a strange envrioment, dogs barking, people coming and going and not used to being in a kennel. Lots of dogs do not show well in shelters. Problems don't manifest themselves until they are in a normal envrioment and feel comfortable. That should not stop a person from adopting, any dog you get weather it be an older dog being rehomes or from a shelter has adjustment problems. No dog is prefect, whatever issues arise should be able to be addressed and corrected with loving patience and training. lots of times dog are there through no fault of their own, owners die and have no one to take them in, untrained dogs through the fault of stupid owners, ect. These dogs deserve a second chance. No such thing as an untrainable dog, its dumb people that should not even have a goldfish to take care of that ruin these dogs. Not the dog's fault, good training and a loving home can work miracles for these animals. Don't hesitate to take in a shelter dog, they will love you forever and they are so deserving of a good home.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  11. #26
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    People who think getting a puppy over a "shelter dog" have never raised a puppy, LOL. Many of those shelter dogs WERE puppies that people thought would be "easier". When they discovered that puppies take work to train, those "easy" puppies ended up at the shelter.

    People who go into pet ownership with the attitude that "I want this or that breed or species because it will be easier" are not ready for a pet. There is nothing "easy" about pet ownership. Pets take time, commitment, work, patience, and money.

    The attitude of looking for a pet that will be "easy" is infuriating, and those are the bulk of pets who end up at shelters.

  12. #27
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    Pups are relentless, they never stop, gets to the point that when they finally crash you tiptoe around not to wake the sleeping monster. A ten minute power nap and they are ready to go again. Some people, especially first time owners have no clue what they are letting themselves in for. And like you said they can't deal with it and the dog winds up in a shelter (or worse)
    They are cute and all that but a lot of work goes into training a dog, dogs do not self train and if the person isn't up to it better to get an older settled dog, get the feel of it before getting a puppy
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    you aren't always able to spot problems while the dog is in a shelter. They are in a strange envrioment, dogs barking, people coming and going and not used to being in a kennel. Lots of dogs do not show well in shelters.
    Very true, which is why lots of rescues in the UK (including the one I volunteer for) use foster homes exclusively and don't re-home any dogs from kennels. It means all of our dogs are thoroughly assessed for a strict minimum of two weeks, in a home environment meaning we get to know pretty much everything there is to know and begin work on any issues/training that may be needed.

    Kennels are not a good place to re-home dogs & I wish more rescues would use foster homes, it makes the world of difference!

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha1 View Post
    I believe that these dogs need and deserve a second chance at a happy life with someone who cares about them. There's no denying that many dogs are dumped off at shelters because their original owner never bothered to properly train them, so they have barking, housebreaking, fear, antisocial issues, etc.

    I've met many dogs that were adopted from shelters that are very sweet, with owners who are happy with their new family members. A man at the park adopted a female Doberman who was very shy and fearful. She was literally his shadow, and would not go more than a few inches away from the man at the park. Now she enjoys her walks, fetches the ball for him, and has a brand new life for herself.

    My neighbor adopted a Chihuahua mix from the shelter, I don't know her past history, but she was the sweetest and most well behaved dog ever. Unfortunately, the man passed away suddenly, and we took the dog for a couple of weeks until one of his family members wanted her for their own. Even though we had little contact with the dog before that, she fit in well with our pets, and was a delight to have around.

    Not everyone has to adopt from a shelter, but they should keep in mind that even if they get a dog from a breeder, if they don't take the time to properly train it and care for it completely, it can easily be worse than a shelter pet when it come to behaving badly.

    Completely agree that these dogs are just as in need of a home, and no far off in personality and trait than an animal you could get elsewhere (i.e., the rehab of Michael's Vicks' dogs) I certainly wouldn't just pick out the first pup I see in a shelter, but people should consider a perpetuating cycle of animals bought from illegal/careless breeders, and a percentage of these animals eventually dumped into shelters, putting pressure on the "need" for Kill-Shelters. Like anything else, research is important and so is being sure on one's decision on adding an animal to their home.

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