Page 8 of 12 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 174

Wildlife Chat, News and Photos

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,358

    Quote Originally Posted by Yetidog37 View Post
    I like wolfs much better But thank you
    The wolves are more beautiful, that's for sure.

  2. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha1 View Post
    The wolves are more beautiful, that's for sure.

    Yes that is part of reason I like them best. and they can run for a long time! I like that to!

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    210
    Feel free to visit my website for information on Reptilian Care
    https://reptile-savvy.weebly.com/

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,311
    How did you get so interested in reptiles?
    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    210
    When my sister brought home a snake while I was still in school and I learnt most things I knew about reptiles at that time were wrong. She was actually one of the sweetest animals I'd ever encountered, she changed my perception and now I can't bare to see them so viciously persecuted, as is normal in society.
    Feel free to visit my website for information on Reptilian Care
    https://reptile-savvy.weebly.com/

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,311
    It is not news anymore, of course, but Cat Wars: The Devestation of a Cuddlly Killer, Chapter 6 "Taking Aim at the Problem" has a lot of information about animals that are not cats whose population control tactics were big news stories at press time - the book copyright date is 2016. The authors, Peter Marra and Chris Santella, repeatedly question the ethics of "killing one species to save another." It is far beyond me why environmentalists and conservationists answer that question with a loud YES. Does anyone think there is justification in shooting owls to slow down their predation on endangered owls?
    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    210
    That’s a very good question CatMom. I’m not familiar with that book or specific case but can answer the question of why conservationists may agree on "killing one species to save another." It’s a matter of weighing up the ethical outcome. I can give you an interesting example of the conservation of Round Island.

    Round Island sits off the coast of Mauritius and is a significant island because of its relatively well preserved state despite the ecological changes caused by invasive herbivorous species, holding some of the only populations of several reptile and plant species that were formally found in Mauritius. Mauritius, much like Australia, Madagascar or any other isolated landmass, is home to a diverse array of rare and endemic animals and plant species unique to the area. There have been many extinctions in the past caused by the introduction of alien species and removal of hardwoods in the 16th century by arriving Europeans, these historic alterations presented problems for the surviving species on the islands. Round Island was visited by an expedition during 1975 where it was found that rabbits and goats had destroyed much of the native vegetation. Eradication of goats and rabbits from the island began, with the complete eradication of goats in 1978 and the final eradication of rabbits in 1986. Three years after the eradication of rabbits from the Island, there was seen to be a marked increase in the regeneration of three endemic tree species and plant species, which were formally grazed by the rabbits. An increase in food availability for native reptiles also followed the eradication of rabbits leading to recent increases in populations of several endemic reptile species, five of which are threatened. Native species often evolve close ecological relationships with each other, if one native species is affected it can have a knock-on effect to another species, an invasive species (a species introduced to the environment from elsewhere) can disrupt the ecology of an environment and indirectly cause problems for whole communities of species. Even though one species may be directly affected by an invasive species, it’s not usually just one species that pays the consequence. Furthermore, the invasive species is often a species that is not threatened with extinction, but the native animals that require conservation are.

    Additionally there is not just a single Ethical view, oftentimes the ethics of a situation is looked at in multiple ways and assessed. I'll name only a few...A Utilitarian approach would consider the moral worth of an action to be determined solely by its contribution to the overall happiness or preferences of the majority (the greatest good for the greatest number of people). In the case of the conservation of reptiles in Mauritius, preservation of the biodiversity of species and beauty of the islands could be considered to contribute to the happiness of those who visit the island and for future generations. The perceived preferences of the native species are also being satisfied through conservation efforts but at the cost of the invasive species.

    Animal Rights holds the belief that humans and animals are both equally subjects of moral concern, humans do not possess a greater importance than animals as one animal is not more important than another. The Universities Federation for Animal Rights delayed the eradication of rabbits in Round Island in 1976 for several years viewing the culling of the rabbits as unjustifiable. However, there is no way to satisfy the needs of both endemic and invasive species simultaneously. Non-lethal removal of the invasive species would be to re-home the animals but captivity is also considered unethical. Furthermore, the relocation of the rabbits would be expensive, stressful and may prove to be an ineffective method of removal of the animals from the island. It therefore seems that humane culling is the only real viable option to aid in the survival of the endemic species.

    Welfarism deems any sentient animal to be worthy of moral consideration, that is animals with the capacity to suffer or creatures that have a perspective or point of view of its own. They argue strongly for the welfare of the animal focussing specifically on the well-being of individuals. Priority is liable to be placed on averting the suffering or premature death of vulnerable individuals, that is to say the endemic species will receive greater interest than the invasive species. Although causing suffering is not viewed as acceptable, humane culling of the invasive species for the benefit of the endangered endemic species may be viewed as a necessary and acceptable course of action provided that suffering is avoided.

    Environmentalists will not just look at individuals but rather at the preservation of entire species and ecosystems, recognising that the survival of species and systems is functionally necessary for the existence and well-being of the individual. Lack of understanding of how ecosystems function can potentially be catastrophic for conservation, either through neglect or by seeking to rescue individuals whilst the systems on which they depend degrade. The successful eradication of introduced rodents from other islets off the coast of Mauritius has led to local conservation bodies investigating the possibility of translocation of rare reptile species from Round Island to these other islets in an effort to reverse the decline of the reptiles and safeguard the species for the future. Rats pose a particular threat since many island species probably lack predator defences necessary for survival. If translocations of reptiles to other islands are to be successful the predatory threat must first be eliminated.

    Even the biblical view of Natural Law (Dominance and Stewardship) can be considered. There is a widespread recognition that people have responsibility to care for the earth and preserve it for our successors. It is thought by some that dominion conveys no more than the ability to rule or govern that makes responsibility possible. Dominion in the bible is also thought to be conditional, and subject to ethical requirements. By the same token dominion was compatible with notions of what later came to be called stewardship. Stewardship is usually regarded as aimed at preserving beauty, usefulness and fruitfulness and therewith the earths’ species. Bryan Norton focussed on the ideal for the preservation of the earths’ species and ecosystems for the sake of human well-being thus moving toward unity among environmentalists.

    Human stewardship over nature can be described as human beings holding the earth as a trust. Mankind is not only responsible for its care but also answerable for the delivery of their role as stewards or trustees (Old Testament). Human beings are said to hold it in trust for the sake of future generations rather than be its owner. In the bible, the earth is understood as belonging not to humanity but to God (Psalm 24) and the land is understood to be held as a leasehold (Leviticus 25:23) and subject to ethical conditions.

    Lynn White suggested that dominion provided human beings with ‘rightful mastery’ over all fellow creatures. It was suggested that all other species were created simply to serve human purposes; therefore the whole of creation existed for the sake of humanity. Some consider that nature should be treated as exclusively a means to human ends. However, Psalm 104 conveys the belief that God is just as concerned for wild species and their habitats as for human beings thus supporting the view of stewardship.

    The approach for the conservation of the species on Round Island appears similar between the different ethical viewpoints. Most views agree that conservation is important not only for animals but can also be beneficial for people. Environmentalism and Natural Law both reach a consensus regarding the importance of the entire ecosystem, that is both sentient and non-sentient life are regarded important in the conservation effort, although natural law may state it is important to tend to all life out of duty, environmentalists recognise the dependence individuals have on the ecosystem and for individuals to thrive, so must the ecosystem. The importance of preservation of species for future generations also seems a significant factor for the reasoning behind conservation efforts. The difference in the views tends to be minor in detail however it is clear that each ethical approach support the argument for strong and robust conservation efforts.
    Feel free to visit my website for information on Reptilian Care
    https://reptile-savvy.weebly.com/

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    210
    Speaking of Mauritius, this puts me in mind of one of my favourite conservation achievements; the conservation of the Mauritian Kestrel, a remarkable effort which brought the species back from the brink of extinction. It was once considered the rarest bird in the world with a population of only 4 individuals in 1974 due to a combination of threats from invasive species, DDT poisoning and bad weather. The species was considered functionally extinct by many but conservation attempts were made non-the-less by Gerald Durrell and Carl Jones. The population grew to around 800 by 2005 but is unfortunately suffering another decline, possibly due to volcanic activity and increased storms.

    Gerald Durrell founded the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust (now the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust) which is dedicated to saving species from extinction. The Durrell Wildlife Park (Jersey Zoo), is a sanctuary and breeding centre for endangered species and can be found on the island of Jersey, I plan a visit some time soon.
    Feel free to visit my website for information on Reptilian Care
    https://reptile-savvy.weebly.com/

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,311
    Thank you for your detailed insight. I believe the Old Testament instructs people to take care of all animals. Some verses are referenced in the book There is Eternal Life for Animals that make it clear God wants people to have pets and care for them. tf a man can receive a death sentence for killing a donkey, I would expect the same for a man who kills a goat or rabbit. However, in Biblical times there was no way to transport those goats and rabbits to a remote island. If there was, Round Island would have already been overrun with invasive goats and rabbits hundreds of years earlier, with most if not all endemic plant species being extinct long before 1975.

    My issue is with the fact that all animals being killed to save another species can feel pain. If killing a rabbit is the best solution (and based on your comments, it seems to just be the most convenient, not best for the animals), why not euthanize rabbits? I do not believe shooting or poisoning any animal is humane because that animal feels pain; if it happened to your cat, you would take it to the ER for life-saving surgery and call the local police department.
    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  10. #115
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,311
    Cat Wars: The Devestating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer:

    https://press.princeton.edu/titles/10809.html

    Excerpt of Chapter 1, The Obituary of the Stephens Island Wren:

    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/the-obituary-of-the-stephens-island-wren/

    Reader discretion is advised in Chapter 6, Taking Aim at the Problem.

    Edit: I previously kept typing the title wrong.
    Last edited by CatMom1994; 03-27-2018 at 01:41 PM.
    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  11. #116
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,311

    Stephens Island Wren

    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  12. #117
    I love that Wren!
    I do a podcast about pets with my sister called: FurBalls & DogBones - A great resource for all things pets!
    Help all the pets you can!

  13. #118
    Quote Originally Posted by Furballs&dogbones View Post
    I love that Wren!

    Me, too!

  14. #119
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,311
    It is not a wren. I assume the bird's appearance and behavior made it so much like a wren nobody knew better until anthropologists were able to do some DNA testing because the SIW was not placed in the wren family.

    Sadly the SIW disappeared only one year after being identified. It is impossible to know what their geographical range was before Tribbles the cat ate them.
    Keep your cats inside and safe.

  15. #120
    Oh dear! I did not know that. But thank you for the info!

Page 8 of 12 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast
Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

Similar Threads

  1. Bird Photos
    By Alpha1 in forum Birds
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12-06-2012, 02:08 PM
  2. Lovebirds - Facts and Photos
    By skarlett88 in forum Birds
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-29-2012, 07:30 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Family & Health Forums: Senior Forums - Health Forum