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Dog Shelter to Remove Breed Labels on Adoptable Pets

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmityvilleAria View Post
    Well that explains a lot!You really do have to have patience with dogs,and for a while now we've had lots of bad information on how to train dogs.
    When I was growing up people just let their dogs out on their owns to take care of their business , I don't think we even had any leashes for our dogs . There was no poop or lease laws . We had GS
    too and I was able to train her to sit and lie down which was more than anyone one else in my family . The dog felt very close to me , she tried to save me when I was drowning as a child .

  2. #17
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    I don't agree with the statement that any dog will fit into any family if its trained correctly. Different dogs (breeds) need different requirements. For example an Irish setter may not be a suitable dog for an apartment dwelling family that leads an inactive lifestyle so the dog may become more of a burden than a joy to own. A lot of people choose a dog because they like the breed and don't take into consideration what that breed needs in terms of grooming, exercise, feeding, etc. as well as temperament (yes I know there are exceptions), and that can mean trouble down the road.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechi2 View Post
    I don't agree with the statement that any dog will fit into any family if its trained correctly. Different dogs (breeds) need different requirements. For example an Irish setter may not be a suitable dog for an apartment dwelling family that leads an inactive lifestyle so the dog may become more of a burden than a joy to own. A lot of people choose a dog because they like the breed and don't take into consideration what that breed needs in terms of grooming, exercise, feeding, etc. as well as temperament (yes I know there are exceptions), and that can mean trouble down the road.
    Well yes,within reason of course.This is why breeds really need to be considered sometimes,even if it is strictly for energy levels and specific requirements of a certain breed.Either way,knowing the breed is definitely important,but once breed and activity and lifestyle IS considered(which it should be to begin with),you can work on the actual training process.If a dog is trained it will have far less problems than a dog someone adopts just because they want to "save a life" or because they find the dog "cute".

    I stand by my principle of training being important though,regardless of breed.You could take a chihuahua or a pit or a lab,but all dogs require training.I honestly don't think just knowing a dog's personality is always enough to decide if it is right for you,since there are other factors than personality like activity level and grooming and many other things people rarely think of until the last moments possible.

  4. #19
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    Oh yes I totally agree that training a dog is important, my point was that successful dog ownership is more likely if the dog is matched well to the owners circumstances and personality, a simple example, if you don't like spending time grooming, a long haired breed may become more of a burden to own. So I feel its important a person know what kind of dog they are getting in order to make an informed decision whether or not that dog is right for them.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechi2 View Post
    Oh yes I totally agree that training a dog is important, my point was that successful dog ownership is more likely if the dog is matched well to the owners circumstances and personality, a simple example, if you don't like spending time grooming, a long haired breed may become more of a burden to own. So I feel its important a person know what kind of dog they are getting in order to make an informed decision whether or not that dog is right for them.
    It is definitely important!Grooming,activity level,how they act around new people,how they are with kids,all those and more are extremely important.More education would be more beneficial than merely sweeping the problems under the rug,of course.

  6. #21
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    It is my job to adapt to the needs of my dog, whatever their breed. I take care of dogs, not breeds. The world is not a perfect or even tidy place, and no amount of snappish ego will make it so.

    Quote Originally Posted by AmityvilleAria View Post
    just because they want to "save a life"
    Oh goodness yes! What a silly pursuit! One that definitely belongs relegated to quotation marks. Saving a life! Hah! What a dismissable joke. The realm of mental weaklings!

    Carry on, Queen of Darkness.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmityvilleAria View Post
    This is why breeds can actually be important.Even more,knowing what breed a dog is can sometimes give you an insight on genetic predisposition to any health problems when it comes to rescued dogs.
    This is getting harder to do today, I asked a lot of dog owners that have a shelter dog what breed their dog is and they have no idea . The dog is mix breed or a' designer' dog , people think the name of the breed is 'cute' and are clueless about the breeds characteristics and the dog turn out to be too much dog for some people . I really hate people breeding designer dogs to made a fast buck.
    I was at the park with my dog and daughter and granddaughter and I met a woman that had a new rescues dog , she had no idea what kind of dog it was , it was part Corgi . Our dogs did their doggies thing and sniffing butts etc and as I was walking away the Corgi dog bite my dog on his butt and wouldn't let go even when I was hitting it with my cane! The dog owner paid for my dog vet bills .
    The couple was shocked and had no idea their dog would attack another dog . My granddaughter was just about to ask if she could pet the Corgi when it attacked my dog ! So now when someone
    said they have a new rescue dog I keep my dog away . I really feel people should get to know their new rescue better before taking it to a park , the people only had their Corgi mix a few days .

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightowl View Post
    This is getting harder to do today, I asked a lot of dog owners that have a shelter dog what breed their dog is and they have no idea . The dog is mix breed or a' designer' dog , people think the name of the breed is 'cute' and are clueless about the breeds characteristics and the dog turn out to be too much dog for some people . I really hate people breeding designer dogs to made a fast buck.
    I was at the park with my dog and daughter and granddaughter and I met a woman that had a new rescues dog , she had no idea what kind of dog it was , it was part Corgi . Our dogs did their doggies thing and sniffing butts etc and as I was walking away the Corgi dog bite my dog on his butt and wouldn't let go even when I was hitting it with my cane! The dog owner paid for my dog vet bills .
    The couple was shocked and had no idea their dog would attack another dog . My granddaughter was just about to ask if she could pet the Corgi when it attacked my dog ! So now when someone
    said they have a new rescue dog I keep my dog away . I really feel people should get to know their new rescue better before taking it to a park , the people only had their Corgi mix a few days .
    People often shy away from knowing what kind of dog they have,but just knowing little things can be so incredibly helpful for training and grooming and more.Shoving breeds under the rug like dirty secrets is not the answer.

    The designer dogs are even worse than shelter dogs,in my opinion.People throw together for example golden retrievers and poodles.In my opinion,that's just a walking disaster of all sorts of genetic health problems and potentially behavior problems that is better off avoided.People justify crossbreds and designer breeds as being so much healthier and better,but really those dogs often carry the same messed up ethics as the bad breeders and pretty much never care about more than the money or the aesthetic.

    People refuse to acknowledge the good breeders,but until we can acknowledge the ethical responsible and entirely dog-driven(not profit-driven)breeders we will not have any progress.Eliminate the backyard breeders and puppy mills and designer dog breeders entirely,and you just might get somewhere.Eliminate irresponsible owners as well,that would help even more.

    The way my mom explains it is extremely reasonable and logical to me at least.If you get an animal no matter where you get them or what kind of animal they are,it is YOUR responsibility to care for them and you are NOT allowed to abandon them at any time.Sadly,that viewpoint isn't shared by every single person in the world.

    Also,you know what saves lives more than just adopting the random cute dog from a shelter or the oldest one in a shelter?Actually getting to know that shelter dog and truly understanding their needs and if they are actually right for you before you go and adopt them and make them have even more misery in their life.As has been said,people should get to know their new rescue.That applies to every single situation in life,even before you adopt the dog or any other animal.You are only doing them a disservice by adopting an animal that is not right for you.

  9. #24
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    again you are blaming the dog for what the owners do. Any dog can bite and you can't know with absolute certainty and your dog or another's dog won't bite. And its not just shelter dogs, you can have a dog for years with no incident then one day it bites someone or another dog. A dog is a dog, they are not humans that think things through and know consequences, they act on the spur of the moment. NO dog is 100% predictable ever!
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    again you are blaming the dog for what the owners do. Any dog can bite and you can't know with absolute certainty and your dog or another's dog won't bite. And its not just shelter dogs, you can have a dog for years with no incident then one day it bites someone or another dog. A dog is a dog, they are not humans that think things through and know consequences, they act on the spur of the moment. NO dog is 100% predictable ever!
    There are factors other than biting that need to be considered as well.

  11. #26
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    why don't you enlighten us with your vast knowledge
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    why don't you enlighten us with your vast knowledge
    Here's a situation.A person goes into a shelter because everyone says to do so,and they end up getting a dog they know pretty much nothing about regardless of background,health,grooming,etc and so they take the dog home.It then ends up that the dog is entirely incorrect for them and has numerous behavioral problems due to past trauma,has an extremely sensitive stomach,the littlest things trigger reactions that end up causing urination,and all because the shelter didn't take time to actually find the perfect dog for them.

    The problem with this situation is it happens all too easily,and I've actually had experience with rescued animals that have had severe trauma and behavioral problems as well as various other things.In particular,one cat I had ended up running away because everyone else got so frustrated with her all the time and didn't consider what she had been through in the past.Most of all,the place we adopted her from didn't even think to tell us anything true about her past.

    No matter what was done,that cat was never truly happy or suitable for us.Had there been time taken to find the perfect cat,yes,it would've actually worked out well.The same goes for dogs and all other animals,really,because if a shelter or any other facility just never takes the time to match individuals perfectly it will not work.Sadly you have some shelters out there that just don't care as much,or those whose ethics are incredibly messed up.

    Factors like the animal's past,the animal's behavior,the animal's potential health conditions and even in some cases traumatic experiences should ALL be considered before that animal is adopted out.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmityvilleAria View Post
    People often shy away from knowing what kind of dog they have,but just knowing little things can be so incredibly helpful for training and grooming and more.Shoving breeds under the rug like dirty secrets is not the answer.

    The designer dogs are even worse than shelter dogs,in my opinion.People throw together for example golden retrievers and poodles.In my opinion,that's just a walking disaster of all sorts of genetic health problems and potentially behavior problems that is better off avoided.People justify crossbreds and designer breeds as being so much healthier and better,but really those dogs often carry the same messed up ethics as the bad breeders and pretty much never care about more than the money or the aesthetic.

    People refuse to acknowledge the good breeders,but until we can acknowledge the ethical responsible and entirely dog-driven(not profit-driven)breeders we will not have any progress.Eliminate the backyard breeders and puppy mills and designer dog breeders entirely,and you just might get somewhere.Eliminate irresponsible owners as well,that would help even more.

    The way my mom explains it is extremely reasonable and logical to me at least.If you get an animal no matter where you get them or what kind of animal they are,it is YOUR responsibility to care for them and you are NOT allowed to abandon them at any time.Sadly,that viewpoint isn't shared by every single person in the world.

    Also,you know what saves lives more than just adopting the random cute dog from a shelter or the oldest one in a shelter?Actually getting to know that shelter dog and truly understanding their needs and if they are actually right for you before you go and adopt them and make them have even more misery in their life.As has been said,people should get to know their new rescue.That applies to every single situation in life,even before you adopt the dog or any other animal.You are only doing them a disservice by adopting an animal that is not right for you.
    The person that bred the first golden retrieve and poodle did this for someone that allergies and wanted a service dog , it wasn't meant to become a fad. I read that guy was sorry he started the designer dogs fad. Some people saw this a easy way to made money and I agree with you it not in best interest for the dogs. When I saw my dog on line I had my daughter and granddaughter come with me ,
    I wanted to see how the dog acted around small children , we were able to spend about hour with the dog to decide if I wanted him , once he went back into crate someone else could adopt him.
    When Marty first saw me he peed on my leg ! I am not sure what that meant but someone said he was marking me as his property . LOL!

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightowl View Post
    The person that bred the first golden retrieve and poodle did this for someone that allergies and wanted a service dog , it wasn't meant to become a fad. I read that guy was sorry he started the designer dogs fad. Some people saw this a easy way to made money and I agree with you it not in best interest for the dogs. When I saw my dog on line I had my daughter and granddaughter come with me ,
    I wanted to see how the dog acted around small children , we were able to spend about hour with the dog to decide if I wanted him , once he went back into crate someone else could adopt him.
    When Marty first saw me he peed on my leg ! I am not sure what that meant but someone said he was marking me as his property . LOL!
    Something people don't also understand about people with allergies is that sometimes their body actually does adapt to certain allergens.I personally know someone who has a rescued designer dog who is very well trained and she is a great dog,but that dog would never be so well behaved and great to be around if she was not trained properly.

    Spending time with a dog before you adopt them and even seeing how they behave in certain scenarios is extremely important,so you definitely did a very good thing there!As for the peeing on the leg,it could be anything from being overly excited or nervous to being territorial.

  15. #30
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    a dog in a shelter situation is not the same dog you bring home. Once the dog gets comfortable in his new home the "real personality" comes out. So if you just basing your choice on what you see in a shelter you may be in for a surprise.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

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