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Dog Shelter to Remove Breed Labels on Adoptable Pets

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmityvilleAria View Post
    Animals regardless of what species they are or where they come from are a lifetime commitment,and until people realize that as well as all the other ridiculous problems are solved we will have people abandoning dogs and there will continue to be problems finding homes for dogs and keeping them in permanent homes.

    Perhaps I have a strong bias against shelters from all the horrible experiences,and perhaps everyone else just has better experiences than I do.
    Of course any pet should have a lifetime commitment, but whether it's researched and purchased from a reputable breeder, adopted from a shelter or rescued off the street, there's no guarantee that the owner will keep them and love them all their lives. Just like babies and children wind up in the system at an adoption agency.

    I'm thankful there are shelters for some of these dogs, and many shelters do a good job in caring for the animal and finding it a good home. Believe me, a puppy mill dog who has been kept in a cage for years, been bred at every heat cycle and whose feet never touched the ground, let alone the grass and earth, who is covered in sores from lying in their own urine and feces, painfully matted because they are never groomed will think of the crappiest city shelter as a 5 star hotel.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Force One View Post
    You seem to require an order that does not exist and a compliance to your will that is unnatural and unhealthy.
    So no, things happen. Life throws some very disruptive stuff at one one point or another, and some people need to try to continue their pet's story in some other way.



    One day you will learn that there are actually very few absolutes in this world. I hope that that happens before you hurt yourself or somebody else.
    Agree, well said.

  2. #47
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    after all your negative remarks about shelters I'm surprised a shelter would even give you a dog. If you went to a shelter with the attitude you've shown here I can see why you had a what you call a bad experience. You need to see things the way they are and not what you want them to be. Time for a reality check AA, you might learn that not everyone else is wrong and only you are right and have all the answers.
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  3. #48
    Honestly, this doesn't sound like a good idea to me. You you purchase a puppy or adopt a dog, you need to know what breed or mix you are getting. Let's say somebody goes into adopt a dog and they don't know a dog is an American Pit Bull Terrier. They aren't going to know that these dogs have aggressive tenancies, shouldn't be allowed around stray cats, are dominant dogs, some can be dog aggressive, there is a lot of improper breeding going on with this breed and a lot of dog aggression. Or, take my breed for example. Yes, Boerboels do end up in rescue. A family could come in seeing a wonderful pet. What they might not see is the strong personality, a male dog that is going to want to be alpha, dominant signs, aggression and a dog that needs an alpha owner. This just seems like a terrible idea. Thankfully, there are people who do their research before adopting/buying a dog, but many don't. A lot of people see an Alaskan Husky and think "sociable, hard working dogs, colder climates", but they may not be thinking "daily brushing, training, wolf like howl."

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boerboel Mom View Post
    Honestly, this doesn't sound like a good idea to me. You you purchase a puppy or adopt a dog, you need to know what breed or mix you are getting. Let's say somebody goes into adopt a dog and they don't know a dog is an American Pit Bull Terrier. They aren't going to know that these dogs have aggressive tenancies, shouldn't be allowed around stray cats, are dominant dogs, some can be dog aggressive, there is a lot of improper breeding going on with this breed and a lot of dog aggression. Or, take my breed for example. Yes, Boerboels do end up in rescue. A family could come in seeing a wonderful pet. What they might not see is the strong personality, a male dog that is going to want to be alpha, dominant signs, aggression and a dog that needs an alpha owner. This just seems like a terrible idea. Thankfully, there are people who do their research before adopting/buying a dog, but many don't. A lot of people see an Alaskan Husky and think "sociable, hard working dogs, colder climates", but they may not be thinking "daily brushing, training, wolf like howl."
    Yes!People often see a cute husky though and think "Oh,it's cute and wolflike let's get it!" only to eventually realize how high energy they are and how much destruction they can cause.They are great dogs,but this is one example of a dog that genuinely is not suited for everyone.

    I don't agree with alpha-based training principles,but I can certainly say that there is a distinct level of stern training and tone you need to have for any breed.It can be extremely helpful to even know a few things about the dog before you get it,and honestly there are quite a few situations where just any dog would not suit just any person.

    It is obviously in the best interest of dogs to have stricter regulations,better matching programs more widely spread,and more shelters with better ethics.Until every shelter is 100 percent ethical,we will continue to have animals die that way as well.

  5. #50
    No matter where you get a dog, breeder or rescue, it's in the best interest of the dog to make sure it finds a forever home. Dogs vary so widely that it's just not a good idea not to let the potential adopters know what they are getting. In fact, I will use a real-life example. A friend of mine bought a Miniature Goldendoodle without realizing the breed needs regular coat maintenance, can be nervous creatures and need daily brushing.

    The dog ended up a matted mess! In order to train the dog to stop barking, my friend chose to use a shock collar, not realizing that Miniature Goldendoodles can be nervous creatures by nature and only succeeded in causing hte dog sevre anxiety.

    The poor thing was almost never brushed and ended up going back to the breeding a matted, dirty, nervous mess!

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boerboel Mom View Post
    No matter where you get a dog, breeder or rescue, it's in the best interest of the dog to make sure it finds a forever home. Dogs vary so widely that it's just not a good idea not to let the potential adopters know what they are getting. In fact, I will use a real-life example. A friend of mine bought a Miniature Goldendoodle without realizing the breed needs regular coat maintenance, can be nervous creatures and need daily brushing.

    The dog ended up a matted mess! In order to train the dog to stop barking, my friend chose to use a shock collar, not realizing that Miniature Goldendoodles can be nervous creatures by nature and only succeeded in causing hte dog sevre anxiety.

    The poor thing was almost never brushed and ended up going back to the breeding a matted, dirty, nervous mess!
    Poor dog Just an example of why certain dogs do not work for everyone!

  7. #52
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    When I got my dog at a shelter I notice he had a cough , the woman doing the paper didn't seem to notice or said nothing . I am hard of hearing and was able to hear my dog cough so the woman had heard it
    too. I was told it was kennel cough and given some meds from my new dog . I could of very easily had I don't want him after all b/c I just had to put down my hearing dog b/c he had cancer and I didn't want
    another sick dog . And boy was he sick , he was passing out while playing in the yard . I thought he was dead the first time he did this ! I had to nurse my dog back health , we been through a lot and I had my dog for 4 years now . He never had perfect health but I never gave up on him . I took him b/c I didn't think anyone else would want to adopt a sick dog. He is a very sweet and smart dog too and I love him a lot !

  8. #53
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    and I'm sure you'd do it all over again. They are worth whatever it takes to make or keep them healthy. Kennel cough is very common in shelters, its treated with anti biotics and its no worse than us getting a bad cold
    he is your friend and protector, he will love you unconditionally, you owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda2147 View Post
    and I'm sure you'd do it all over again. They are worth whatever it takes to make or keep them healthy. Kennel cough is very common in shelters, its treated with anti biotics and its no worse than us getting a bad cold
    It turned out my dog had pneumonia and not kennel cough and he was impacted too . It took 3 months to get him better.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha1 View Post
    I'm lost here. What dog is perfect, whether it's from a shelter or a breeder? The park I go to every day is full of rescue dogs, some are happy and obedient, some have issues that the owner is helping them with. What kind of self-centered person would get a dog and decide it wasn't perfect for them so they get rid of it? I know it happens or there wouldn't be any dogs in shelters, there are unethical breeders, shelters and owners IMO.

    How many people don't have any common sense when it comes to judging any dog? I wouldn't go to a kennel, hook a leash up to a dog and take it home in my car blindly. People spend time with the dog before they take it. Shelters give any information about the dog that they have, whether it's friendly with other pets, whether it's fearful, if it was brought in as an abuse case, known health problems, etc.

    Lots of people take great pleasure in working with a dog to overcome a problem, even purebreds straight from the breeder can be shy, a bit fearful, a little aggressive, etc. There's no guarantee that any dog is going to be "perfect", and in my opinion, the well being of the animal should be first and foremost, not a picky new owner who puts the dog back in the pound because it wasn't just perfect for them.

    And who cares what kind of toys a dog played with in the past, that's so petty really. Especially with a rescue pet, you're giving them a new loving home, bonding with them and letting them trust you and have a new life experience. Any toys, beds or other things you may get for the dog can be just as much appreciated by the animal, they don't need a repeat of what they had in the past. They live in the moment, and their future depends on how much you care.

    A man at the park rescued a female Doberman years ago. She was very shy and fearful. When I first saw him with her she had no confidence at all, and clung to his ankles for security, where he could barely walk. I tried to pet her and she just hid behind him. I see them a lot these days and you wouldn't believe it's the same dog, she loves it at the park and they're so happy with each other. She's overcome all her insecurities and the love they have for each other shines through clearly.

    There's so many stories like that. If anybody has to overthink getting a pet that much, they probably shouldn't get one, their too involved with themselves. Plenty of people go to a shelter and just click with a dog, they want to save a life, give a second chance or just want the dog because it's cute. Most people can reason whether a dog is too big, or too high energy for their household or family. As someone here said earlier, we take care of the dog, that's our role as their owners and caretakers.

    I can research for years about a breed, decide I want an Airedale Terrier because they would fit my lifestyle and I liked their characteristics. I can go to a reputable breeder and purchase one and realize in a short time that even though it's the dog breed that seemed perfect for me, the dog wasn't working out. Well, I could dump it back off at the breeder and take a loss, or I could do the right thing and work with the dog to correct any problems there may be.

    Of course every dog, regardless of age or breed needs some training by the owner. No match is picture perfect from the start. It's almost like somebody having a baby, and as it starts to get older it becomes very bratty and difficult, may even bite people......well, you work with the child, is there ever real perfection in life relationships? Were any people or animals born on this earth just to please another, no, we get together and everyone's results are individual and unique.
    Absolutely right Alpha!!!

  11. #56
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    People aren't perfect so why should we expect our pets to be perfect !

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