Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Alendronate (fosamax) making my cat really ill

  1. #1

    Alendronate (fosamax) making my cat really ill

    Hi there
    I need your help
    My cat has idiopathic hypercalcemia. The only thing keeping her alive is the human drug called alendronate (Fosamax). However it makes her so sick she won't eat. So now she just keeps loosing weight and is really unhappy I have to think of "quality of life". Any ideas? Have you used this drug before and has it made your cat sick? I know the drug has only been used on animals for two years so they don't know a lot about it.
    Thanks
    Sam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,336
    Sorry to hear about your cat, I have no personal experience with hypercalcemia, so no personal advice to offer. I have read that changing completely to canned or raw food is key, dry food makes the condition worse. I know Fosamax is not the idea drug even for people, so I would consider getting her off that asap with the supervision of your vet of course. An alternative that may make your cat feel a bit better is Prednisone instead. Some info on this site from people who have been through it with their cats, maybe some useful info if you haven't already visited there. Good luck and let us know how she's doing.

    Have you discussed with your vet the possibility of using prednisolone instead of Fosamax? Fosamax ruined my cat’s life and it’s a miracle he’s still alive.

    I am NOT a veterinarian and I CAN NOT give medical advice but I strongly suggest discussing this post with your vet. Fosamax has been known to cause 2 side effects in humans: brittle bones/fractures and also BRONJ (basically, jawbone death). My cat likely suffered BOTH of these complications.

    To make a long story short, he had a tooth pulled and the extraction site would not heal, no matter what my veterinarian did. Several months later after multiple surgeries to suture up the extraction site, his jawbone became severely infected and a bony mass developed (basically a bony mass of infected jawbone). At around the same time this was happening, my cat Teddy fractured both of his rear legs after a minor fall from the kitchen counter. Thankfully they were able to fix his legs with major surgery but they will never be 100% back to normal. He still lives with the mass in his jaw because the risks of jaw surgery and complications are too great for him.

    Had he been on prednisolone from the beginning (instead of Fosamax) it’s quite possible that his calcium would have been controlled and he wouldn’t have suffered such horribly devastating side effects. However we will never know for sure. I cannot give medical advice- discuss with your vet.
    SOURCE



  3. #3
    Hi Pack leader and lover!
    Thank you so much for taking your time to respond. I really appreciate it!
    I have been seeing a "medicine" specialist since January. We tried the steriod treatment but it didn't work. We then went to an infusion of pamidronate. It has fixed every other cat that they have seen with hyercalcemia in the first go. It didn't work on my cat . I tried this pamidronate (where she has to be sedated and watched closely over a few days as she may go HYPOcalcemia and have seizures and die) five times and her calcium kept climbing back up and it started doing it within a week (where before it would take month)! I then went to alendronate even though I know this drug could cause her jaw to die then the specialist said we would have to put her down.
    Her calcium is still high... 1.43 (it is supposed to be 1.2 - 1.35) but it is a lot better as it was 1.92 where it was damaging her kidneys!!!!! However she is so down and out and won't eat now. The alendronate also causes runny poo's, stomach ulcers and severe nausea.
    I am waiting for this special diet from Spain which is high fibre - but I will def give wet food and raw food a go even though I haven't heard of that working. Thanks for that! Today though I am on Fancy Feast from the supermarket. LOL. Trying anything basically.
    Thanks once again
    Sam

  4. #4
    By the way pack leader... I just went to that site and it is amazing!!!! Thank you sooooooo much!!!!
    Sam

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,949
    I take Fosomax myself for osteoporosis. The instructions are crystal clear: Only take it on an empty stomach with a full glass of water, then fast and stay upright for at least 30 minutes. The consequences of not doing so (for humans, of course) are related to the pill getting stuck in the esophagus. If your cat has pain between her mouth and stomach, a possible cause (assuming cats are like humans with the drug) would be an espohogeal ulcer. Prevention is impossible for a cat because you have to force down a prescribed amount of water via syringe to make sure she gets enough and can't tell her to remain vertical for a certain time period.

    I have no experience with hypercalcemia, however, and don't want to recommend stopping Fosomax cold turkey without getting another medication to try. You should get a second opinion if your vet is refusing to consider anything else.

  6. #6
    Hi Cat Mom
    Thank you for all the great information! It really helps!
    If there was anything else I could try I would. There is not. It is heartbreaking having to give your cat a drug every week that makes her really ill. Even with chemo there is a relief period. If I don't give it to her her kidneys fail and I will have to put her down anyway.
    I will make sure I walk her for a longer period - maybe that will help
    Thanks again
    Sam

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,336
    More info that may help, change of diet is a must for sure. I know it must be heartbreaking to treat her with a drug only to have it make her feel more sickly. Wishing you the best, more info HERE.

    Idiopathic Hypercalcemia of Cats

    A syndrome in young to middle-aged cats, first described in the early 1990s, involves hypercalcemia that occurs without obvious explanation. It has been suggested that the feeding of acidifying, magnesium-restricted diets predisposes cats to idiopathic hypercalcemia. Another plausible hypothesis is that excessive dietary vitamin D content in some cat foods may contribute to this condition.

    Total serum calcium is increased for months to years, often without obvious clinical signs in the early stages. Ionized calcium is increased, sometimes out of proportion to the increase in total serum calcium. Longhaired cats may be over-represented; most are not azotemic at initial diagnosis but may later develop azotemia. PTH levels are either low or remain within the reference range, PTHrP is not detectable, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcitriol levels are within normal limits.



    Intensive treatment for idiopathic hypercalcemia is rarely indicated, because hypercalcemia has developed gradually and is relatively longstanding, and dramatic clinical signs are usually absent. Most cats can be treated as outpatients with dietary change either alone or in combination with drug therapy.



    Diet modification is recommended as a first-line treatment. If an acidifying diet is being fed, it should be discontinued. A number of different diets have been recommended, including high-fiber diets, kidney diets, or diets developed to prevent calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Others recommend feeding canned diets with a composition similar to what cats would eat in the wild (ie, 40%–60% of calories as protein, 30%–50% fat, and <15% carbohydrates). No matter what type of diet is chosen, it is best to feed a wet-only diet to promote urinary dilution and lessen the chance of calcium oxalate stone formation. Administration of prednisone results in longterm decreases in ionized and total calcium concentrations in some cats.



    If normocalcemia has not been restored after a dietary feeding trial of 6–8 wk, treatment with glucocorticosteroids or bisphosphonates should be considered. Prednisone is given orally at 5 mg/cat/day for 1 mo before reevaluation. If the serum ionized calcium concentration is normal, this dose is continued for several months. If the ionized calcium value is still increased, the dosage is gradually increased to 10–20 mg/cat/day as needed to restore normocalcemia.

    Alternatively, treatment with the bisphosphonate alendronate can be instituted, starting at 10 mg orally once weekly; the dosage can be increased to 20–30 mg per week, as needed. It is extremely important to administer alendronate after a 12-hour fast, because food significantly reduces drug absorption; the fast should also be continued for at least 2 hr after alendronate administration. Erosive esophagitis is a known adverse effect of oral bisphosphonates in human patients.

    Although the risk of development of esophagitis in cats is unknown, the owner can give 5–6 mL of water to the cat with a dosing syringe immediately after administration of the alendronate; a small amount of butter applied to the cat’s lips may increase licking and salivation and promote the transit of the pill to the stomach. The longterm safety and efficacy of oral bisphosphonates in cats are currently unknown, but alendronate appears to be relatively safe for use in cats.



  8. #8
    Pack leader - you really are amazing THANK YOU!!!!!!
    Where did you find that info from?
    Sam
    PS She is eating a little bit of wet food! This is the first time in her 14 years she has done this SO I am not looking back and I am only doing wet food from now on! I had changed her diet quite a few times from advice from the specialists at the university here.. but it had always been biscuits as she wouldn't touch wet food.

  9. #9
    sorry.... pack leader... i just found the link you included!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,949
    Quote Originally Posted by sam100 View Post
    Hi Cat Mom
    Thank you for all the great information! It really helps!
    If there was anything else I could try I would. There is not. It is heartbreaking having to give your cat a drug every week that makes her really ill. Even with chemo there is a relief period. If I don't give it to her her kidneys fail and I will have to put her down anyway.

    I will make sure I walk her for a longer period - maybe that will help.
    Actually sitting up is what she needs to do. When a cat walks, her digestive tract is parallel to the floor - exactly what you want to avoid. But anything is better than sleeping with her head upside down.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,336
    Quote Originally Posted by sam100 View Post
    Pack leader - you really are amazing THANK YOU!!!!!!
    Where did you find that info from?
    Sam
    PS She is eating a little bit of wet food! This is the first time in her 14 years she has done this SO I am not looking back and I am only doing wet food from now on! I had changed her diet quite a few times from advice from the specialists at the university here.. but it had always been biscuits as she wouldn't touch wet food.
    Make the wet food tempting, there are ways. You can buy freeze dried cat treats like those from Orijen, just crumble on between your fingers onto the food and your cat should love it....mine does.

  12. #12
    oh she loves walks! she is an inside cat and sits by the door and wants to go out a couple of times a day. we walk around the apartment complex and she just follows me so it is all good!

  13. #13
    will do! she has never liked treats before but her tastes are changing so i will try! she was on cerenia (for nausea) and mirtazaphine (appetite stimulant) and they both worked really well but the effectness has sadly worn off!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,949
    I hate to make you feel worse, but at age 14 and with a chronic illness, she needs to stop taking walks outside. Is it possible to stimulate indoor playtime and distract her from the door?

    I renamed mirtazapine "meowsapine" because the cat I gave it to sounded like a Siamese for two days. During that time she ate like Cookie Monster, more than tripling her regular food intake. Unfortunately she threw up the pill after I got it down her throat four times.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,336
    Quote Originally Posted by sam100 View Post
    oh she loves walks! she is an inside cat and sits by the door and wants to go out a couple of times a day. we walk around the apartment complex and she just follows me so it is all good!
    I'm glad you're taking her for walks outdoors in nature, I think that's so important for our cats (and dogs), it's very beneficial to both physical and mental health, in my opinion.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

Similar Threads

  1. we are making progress
    By linda2147 in forum Cat General
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 11-27-2017, 06:59 PM
  2. We are making a pet app and would love your feedback!
    By petapp in forum Looking for Support
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-01-2017, 07:53 PM
  3. Just a new member making himself known.
    By Melchiah in forum Introductions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-07-2016, 02:03 PM
  4. Making your bed with a cat's help
    By linda2147 in forum Cat General
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-28-2015, 05:48 AM
  5. Making Bread
    By Alpha1 in forum Cat Training and Behavior
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-25-2012, 07:09 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Family & Health Forums: Senior Forums - Health Forum