Chicago to Phnom Penh

gregorymatthew

New member
Joined
Oct 16, 2018
My wife and I are relocating to Phnom Penh from Chicago in the coming year and are in the midst of the very arduous process of finding out how to get our two 27 kg pitbulls from here to there.


There are many breed and flight restrictions. We have even begun exploring taking the Queen Mary 2 to Germany (Bully breed are banned in the UK, which is animal bigotry) and proceed to take the unbelievable 11k+ kilometer land journey essentially across the entirety of the Earth.


Needless to say, come hell or high water, we will arrive with our pitties, just any help anyone can give would be amazing.


Doesn't matter how small, how seemingly stupid, or out-of-this-world, we are trying to do something which all signs point to as impossible. I'm not an impossible kinda guy, so we have to make this work.
 

Dog Force One

Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2015
Hi GM- What would happen if things in Cambodia did not go as you planned or hoped and you needed to return? Does the country itself allow Pitties to be imported? I know some neighboring countries don't. Traveling overland from Germany to Cambodia sounds horrendous and very risky.

The original post frames your situation as a question of not leaving your pitties behind, but I would offer that this is more a question of forgoing whatever the plan was in Cambodia to stay with your Pitties in your current country. Honestly, are you doing your beloved pets any favors dragging them overland around the world on a very dangerous journey? I would find a different job, or whatever.

That is devotion to your pets, not putting them through hell and asking for any of a thousand heartbreaking tragedies along the way.

Loading your family in a rubber dinghy and pushing off from San Francisco makes the same amount of sense.
 

gregorymatthew

New member
Joined
Oct 16, 2018
Original Poster
Hi GM- What would happen if things in Cambodia did not go as you planned or hoped and you needed to return? Does the country itself allow Pitties to be imported? I know some neighboring countries don't. Traveling overland from Germany to Cambodia sounds horrendous and very risky.

The original post frames your situation as a question of not leaving your pitties behind, but I would offer that this is more a question of forgoing whatever the plan was in Cambodia to stay with your Pitties in your current country. Honestly, are you doing your beloved pets any favors dragging them overland around the world on a very dangerous journey? I would find a different job, or whatever.

That is devotion to your pets, not putting them through hell and asking for any of a thousand heartbreaking tragedies along the way.

Loading your family in a rubber dinghy and pushing off from San Francisco makes the same amount of sense.
I was going through old emails and came across this.

I wanted to let you know how well everything went.

We left from JFK in October of 2019. They flew KLM Cargo to Amsterdam where there is a vet staffed pet hotel. They were walked, fed, and checked out during their eight hour layover.

They arrived in Bangkok before us by about two hours. I’ll tell you when we pulled up to the importer‘s office and I saw two grey crates inside my heart skipped a beat. Once in I saw both my dogs safe and sound.

We stayed in Bangkok for five days before loading into a large van and driving to the boarder town of PoiPet. There we loaded them on a hand drawn milk truck and carried them across the boarder.

Once across we loaded them into another large van before driving through the night to Phnom Penh.

We all lived in a hotel room for two weeks while we looked for a new home. We found house bigger than the one we left in Chicago (and it was a quarter of the price), with two outdoor spaces we turned into gardens.

The last two years have been filled with sunshine, geckos, frogs, and all kinds of life for them to chase and we get to spend all day every day together.

I suppose the moral of the story is had I listened to fear I would be with them in a failed state. Instead, we are all living our best and most natural lives.

Sure, there is always “what if something bad happens?”, but there is also “what if it all works out just fine?”

We are all grateful I chose the latter.
 

Top