Cooper Peed on the Floor again...

skarlett88

New member
Joined
Mar 30, 2012
Location
Canada
This morning my husband and I were chatting over Skype when his dog, who hadn't given any indication of needing to go outside, just up and peed on the floor like it was an ordinary thing. He's one. Can we chock this up to his being a puppy and he'll grow out of it, or is this something that needs to be addressed more specifically? My husband smacked his dog on the head, told him NO and put him outside after this happened. Good tactic, or no? Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.
 

Alpha1

Pack Leader and Lover
Joined
Mar 28, 2012
Location
USA
This morning my husband and I were chatting over Skype when his dog, who hadn't given any indication of needing to go outside, just up and peed on the floor like it was an ordinary thing. He's one. Can we chock this up to his being a puppy and he'll grow out of it, or is this something that needs to be addressed more specifically? My husband smacked his dog on the head, told him NO and put him outside after this happened. Good tactic, or no? Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.
Bad tactic, IMO. He won't just grow out of it if he's not properly trained. Dogs don't think like us, but they are eager to please their masters and look to them for direction and guidance.

If the dog isn't caught 'in the act', then he should just put the dog out and clean it up. Hitting the dog or yelling at it after the fact only causes confusion for the animal. They know the owner is angry, but they can't relate why.

Best way to train is to catch the dog while he's relieving himself, stop it in the process, and guide the dog to where he should finish, whether it's newspapers near the door for a young puppy, or out the back door for the older pup.

The dog should be approached in a calm way when caught in the middle of the act. He should be told "No", and taken to where he should go, then told "You go here". After a couple of times they get the idea.

During the training period, it's up to us to pay attention to them, and read their body language. Not all dogs whine or pace by the door, their signs are more subtle, like looking at the owner. My guy is ten years old, and he comes over sits, looks at me...if I ask if he wants to go out, he's anxious to go.

After eating, after drinking, after naps are all times when it's our obligation to let them outside even if they don't 'ask'. Nine times out of ten, they'll take a leak as soon as they hit the grass.
 

deemac80

New member
Joined
Mar 28, 2012
Location
ottawa, canada
OMG you should never smack a dog on its head for peeing on the floor. Even when a dog doesn't show signs that they need to go outside doesn't mean they are not holding it in. Like mentioned above, a dogs memory span is so short it might as well be none existant. They cannot remember things as quickly as we like. Puppies are even worse, when they gotta go, they go. I would suggest arranging a set schedule to take your dog out. As much as you may not like it, it should be a minimum of every 90-120 minutes until they realize that this is the place I do this. The best time to train a dog is right in the act of peeing inside. The minute you see him doing it, you tell him/her in a deep firm voice (don't scream, this confuses the dog) NO! They should stop in mid stream and then take the dog out immediately. This should eventually train him that outside is bathroom time. Hope this helps.
 

Alpha1

Pack Leader and Lover
Joined
Mar 28, 2012
Location
USA
This may not be the case here, but a lot of people make the mistake of giving dog's human characteristics when perceiving their actions. Like somone will say, the dog just did that to pi** them off, or the dog was getting them back for a recent punishment.

Like assuming the dog can reason why it's being hit or yelled at, after the deed...it's just not so. Although dogs are VERY forgiving and loyal to their masters, this type of discipline wears away at the bond, IMO.
 


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