Dog Fostering and Adoption Infographic

haopee

BACON of Light
Joined
Nov 6, 2012
Location
Philippines
Okay. I promise this would be my last, but I just love how they titled the infographic "When Julie Met Charlie". It sounds like a love story that's about to happen... with the inclusion of statistics, of course.

What better way to educate ourselves about dog adoption and fostering.

 

Goldfinch7

New member
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Location
South Wales, UK
That's a great little poster, and more knowledge of rescue and fostering is a great thing. I would hope though, that it doesn't incourage people to become foster carers simply to "road test" dogs, to find the right one for them.
 

haopee

BACON of Light
Joined
Nov 6, 2012
Location
Philippines
Original Poster
That's a great little poster, and more knowledge of rescue and fostering is a great thing. I would hope though, that it doesn't incourage people to become foster carers simply to "road test" dogs, to find the right one for them.
Rainbow Bridge forbid! I agree that it shouldn't be an encouragement to try fostering for the sake of looking for the right one... Although I have read of foster failure stories (fosters ending up getting adopted by their foster parents). Still, people should understand that fostering takes time, effort and dog knowledge- even a certain financial capacity.

I do hope it does give them an idea of how the foster system works and what they should be expecting on it. Perhaps you might have some tips on what people should know before they decide to foster.
 

Goldfinch7

New member
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Location
South Wales, UK
I think most of the fosters in the charity are "foster failures" lol! And those that haven't failed, foster because they adopted a dog from the charity and found out all about it and wanted to do it.

If there's anyone out there thinking of fostering, all I can really say is - if you have the time and lots of love to give, please, please consider it! It can be extremely hard work at times - some of the dogs have separation anxiety, most need house training and lots have various issues that need working through. But, watching a scared, confused little dog come into your home and helping them get over their problems and move on to their forever homes.
 

haopee

BACON of Light
Joined
Nov 6, 2012
Location
Philippines
Original Poster
I think most of the fosters in the charity are "foster failures" lol! And those that haven't failed, foster because they adopted a dog from the charity and found out all about it and wanted to do it.

If there's anyone out there thinking of fostering, all I can really say is - if you have the time and lots of love to give, please, please consider it! It can be extremely hard work at times - some of the dogs have separation anxiety, most need house training and lots have various issues that need working through. But, watching a scared, confused little dog come into your home and helping them get over their problems and move on to their forever homes.
Thanks, GF.

A friend of mine who fosters schnauzer adoptables have taken care of so many anxious dogs. One of them had a very bad skin condition. She came from a puppy mill and she was literally bald. The poor thing had her ears and tail clipped so short which was bad enough. And to top it off, she scratched so much it made her anxious.

She was also such a scaredy bug that whenever they would come out for walks, she's bark and twitch at everything as if she was under attack. I believe fosters should be prepared for this.

By the way, how about expenses... can you share with us what fosters are expected to do? Will they be spending their money in taking care of a dog? Who spends on medical bills and vet visits? Sorry if this sounds like an interview... infographics don't have all the information we want to know.:D
 

Goldfinch7

New member
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Location
South Wales, UK
Happy to answer any questions I can about fostering :) The charity I volunteer for supplies everything & you should not have to spend a penny on fosters - all food, collars, leads, toys, bedding etc is supplied and vet treatment paid for directly to vet by the charity (fosters take their dogs to one of the charities approved vets who we have an account with). It is inevitable that you do spend some money on your fosters, I'm always buying treats and toys but you don't have to.

Most, if not all, charities in the UK will pay for all vet treatment and lots supply food etc, but some ask their fosters to pay for their fosters food as their "donation" to the charity.
 

NClady520

New member
Joined
May 15, 2013
Location
NC
The rescues around here don't provide diddly, for the most part. There are only two within 25 miles of me who will pay for anything other than emergency vet care. I think people would be more willing to foster if they knew they didn't have to pay for toys, food, and leashes.
 

Goldfinch7

New member
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Location
South Wales, UK
It can be really hard for rescues, most are completely self funded and sadly there are more dogs than they can cope with needing help, so it can be hard to juggle everything. It's a shame, and I wouldn't be able to afford to foster if I had to pay for all vet treatment etc (which is why I only have one dog of my own - I can feed, insure care for and spoil him all he needs and wants, but if I had a second dog I couldn't).
 


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