Dog Vomiting Episodes Due to Cytopoint

Mayasmom

New member
Joined
Jul 13, 2021
Anyone else’s dog almost die after a Cytopoint injection?? My 2 year old pit/ American Bull mix has suffered with allergies from day one. I have had her since she was weaned, and have always had her on a very limited vaccine schedule. She was on a limited raw food diet and was still suffering terrible allergies. When the vet recommended Cytopoint, I should have done more research, but at that point I felt so bad for her, I just wanted to believe something would help. The first 2 shots were like a miracle. Her itching was relieved (mostly), hair on her face grew back, and ear infections stopped.

Then she had her 3rd Cytopoint shot and everything went wrong. Less than 24 hours later, she had unstoppable diarrhea, followed by no appetite and vomiting. She shivered a lot and was in obvious distress. The vet blamed it on her raw diet. She was treated with anti nausea meds, fluids, and antibiotics, as the vet was convinced it was a bacterial infection. Though she nearly died, her symptoms resolved in a few days, and I changed her to a high quality kibble diet, per the vet’s instructions. A month later, severe vomiting returned. This time, I didn’t give the antibiotics because I knew it wasn’t “raw food” related. Once again, the vet gave fluids and nausea meds and her symptoms were resolved. He said we would need to address her allergies (as she was itching again) but agreed that Cytopoint may have caused her reaction, so we would deal with allergies once her vomiting had resolved.
After this incident, I changed her diet to a human grade, cooked diet. Her allergies subsided and haven’t returned.

Sadly, about once a month she has violent vomiting episodes. I believe 100% that Cytopoint has caused this. Prior to Cytopoint, my dog had never had diarrhea or vomiting episodes. Ever. Now we have unexplained vomiting that happens monthly for no apparent reason?? My dog lives indoors, and I watch her when she goes potty (in my yard). I keep a clean home (nothing for her to get into), and I monitor her diet closely bc of her allergies. I am going to take her to an integrative vet and see if we can resolve the vomiting issue or at least detox her. Has anyone else’s dog had a similar reaction?
 

CatMom1994

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Welcome to the forum. Thank you for posting. What is your dog's name?

Not only have many dogs almost died, but many dogs lost the battle. Your dog is very lucky to be alive.

The American Veterinary Medical Association's official position on raw diets is no pets should eat them. Veterinary college students are not taught anything good about feeding homemade or raw diets unless they decide to specialize in nutrition or alternative medicine because of this policy. At those hospitals, however, you can meet the right type of veterinary specialist to resolve vomiting and diarrhea in a dog with allergies.
 

linda2147

Active member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
stick with the raw diet, regardless of what the vets tell you its the best thing for them. With the right additives it will be fine. My shepherd is ten years old, I'be been feeding raw for many years with no issues ever. my dog still runs around and acts like a puppy, At the very least add one probiotic daily to her diet. Dogs immunity begins in the gut, and the probiotic will keep her healthy. If you want to know what additives I add just ask. I'll be glad to help you with a good raw diet.
 

Mayasmom

New member
Joined
Jul 13, 2021
Original Poster
Welcome to the forum. Thank you for posting. What is your dog's name?

Not only have many dogs almost died, but many dogs lost the battle. Your dog is very lucky to be alive.

The American Veterinary Medical Association's official position on raw diets is no pets should eat them. Veterinary college students are not taught anything good about feeding homemade or raw diets unless they decide to specialize in nutrition or alternative medicine because of this policy. At those hospitals, however, you can meet the right type of veterinary specialist to resolve vomiting and diarrhea in a dog with allergies.
Welcome to the forum. Thank you for posting. What is your dog's name?

Not only have many dogs almost died, but many dogs lost the battle. Your dog is very lucky to be alive.

The American Veterinary Medical Association's official position on raw diets is no pets should eat them. Veterinary college students are not taught anything good about feeding homemade or raw diets unless they decide to specialize in nutrition or alternative medicine because of this policy. At those hospitals, however, you can meet the right type of veterinary specialist to resolve vomiting and diarrhea in a dog with allergies.
Thank you. My dog’s name is Maya. I love her so much and I am kicking myself for allowing the Cytopoint shot. I had literally tried so much to resolve her itching naturally and I was just sick inside from seeing her scratch, get ear infections, and lick her paws raw. I am usually super holistic and research everything. Prior to covid, I had been taking her to an integrative veterinarian, but when Covid happened, she only did the curbside thing. That would have been fine, but her office people vaccinated my dog without doing a titer first. (I always titer, and only vaccinate when the titer shows a need for it). Anyhow, I took her to a traditional vet (a friend of my husband), bc I knew I would be allowed to be with my dog and advocate for her. Now this. We are going back to the integrative vet. I am just praying she will be okay. Any ideas on how to reverse damage from Cytopoint?
 

Mayasmom

New member
Joined
Jul 13, 2021
Original Poster
stick with the raw diet, regardless of what the vets tell you its the best thing for them. With the right additives it will be fine. My shepherd is ten years old, I'be been feeding raw for many years with no issues ever. my dog still runs around and acts like a puppy, At the very least add one probiotic daily to her diet. Dogs immunity begins in the gut, and the probiotic will keep her healthy. If you want to know what additives I add just ask. I'll be glad to help you with a good raw diet.
I would love to know what probiotic you use. I have been giving her Kefir on her fresh diet. I currently give her Ollie (it’s cooked, but human grade food). I had her on raw (Steve’s I think), but she still had allergies. I’m so pleased that her allergies are resolved on this food, I am afraid to switch her again. I am not sure what that shot did to her that made her so ill, but I am hoping to get her as healthy I can. She is fine most of the time, but randomly, like once a month has terrible vomiting episodes. I would love to know what supplements you have found to be good. I am taking her back to the integrated vet, and hopefully I can get some answers. I don’t understand the Cytopoint enough to know how to detox her.
 

TTouch

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
Hi and welcome

The FDA encourages veterinarians and animal owners to report adverse events associated with drugs or devices used in animals. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/report-problem/how-report-animal-drug-and-device-side-effects-and-product-problems

Vets are medically trained, and Vet colleges are sponsored by kibble manufacturers, so the only training they get is from those kibble manufacturers which is often one day seminars during their 7 yrs of training and of course they also get commission when in practice for selling kibble and 'advised' by kibble sales reps ( also not nutritionally trained/qualified) who sell them kibble, so unless the Vet takes additional training/qualifications they are not nutritional specialists.

Western society has developed over the decades into demanding a 'quick fix' to all and anything including 'fixing' any 'medical' issues, we have messed around with genetics, we consume more than we produce etc etc and as our pets now live in our homes we extend these demand lead needs to our pets too.
So vets ( like human doctors) along with drug companies who are continually developing new medicines to satisfy expectations of us humans to 'fix' the issue but normally that now means covering them up and not finding out the reason and 'mending' that.

An allergy is a state of over-reactivity or hypersensitivity of the immune system to a particular allergen. Most allergens are proteins from plants, insects, envirnomental, or foods...... so for me it is not about 'covering up' using wonder drugs but ensuring the immune system is working at optimum level, but vets are in business to make money and so medication is their number one go to, it keeps the client returning to spend more and satisfies the dog owner as they can't 'see' the problem anymore.
Covering it up doesn't 'mend' it, it is still there, so it will come back and we are told sometimes by laws, sometimes by fashion trends, sometimes by vets that our dogs need to be annually vaccinated, (untrue) that chemical fleas treatments/wormers need to be a monthly 'treatment' but they are chemical posions, we are bombarded by marketing about kibble telling us all sorts of nonsense, yet in most instances the bag it comes in costs more to produce than the contents along with the terminology used like 'human grade' or 'natural ingredients' which is very misunderstood by the public...human grade just means when it is killed, not when it was produced, natural ingredients, wood/sawdust is natural, in the ingredients it is called 'ash' , 'carbon'. We are obsessed with germs and cleanliness so use chemical products in our homes where our dogs live now and many of these products do reduce the affectiveness of the immune system in our dogs and us too.
 

linda2147

Active member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
I'll start with chicken but change the protein source every month or so so they don't get sensitive to one source. I'lll start with chicken but goes for all. I take the skin off the chicken then grind it bones and all then at feeding time I add 1/4 cup of honest kitchen with equal amount of warm water, let it sit untilit thickens then add it to the meat mixture, then add 1 teaspoon of missing link for skin and coat the honest kitchen is all the fruits and veggies they need, the missing link is all the vitamins and minerals they may be missing in the diet. After feeding I give one probiotic, two one fish oil pill and two glucosamine tablets.

don't use any scented things in the house or around her, no scented candles, room freshners ect. get unscented baby wipes and wipe her feet belly and face whenever she comes in from outside, this will get off any allergins she might pick up outside. You can also get a bottle of colloidial silver and mix it with water, put in spray bottle and spray her a c couple of times a day, this will kill any bacteria that may be on her skin.

hope this helps and good luck

I also make my own treats, take the skin off chicken breast, but in slices no more than a half inch thick then dehydrate, put in dehydrator until they know longer look shiny let cool and ready to serve. dogs love them and there is nothing but plain chicken in them
 

sydneysmom

New member
Joined
Aug 4, 2021
Anyone else’s dog almost die after a Cytopoint injection?? My 2 year old pit/ American Bull mix has suffered with allergies from day one. I have had her since she was weaned, and have always had her on a very limited vaccine schedule. She was on a limited raw food diet and was still suffering terrible allergies. When the vet recommended Cytopoint, I should have done more research, but at that point I felt so bad for her, I just wanted to believe something would help. The first 2 shots were like a miracle. Her itching was relieved (mostly), hair on her face grew back, and ear infections stopped.

Then she had her 3rd Cytopoint shot and everything went wrong. Less than 24 hours later, she had unstoppable diarrhea, followed by no appetite and vomiting. She shivered a lot and was in obvious distress. The vet blamed it on her raw diet. She was treated with anti nausea meds, fluids, and antibiotics, as the vet was convinced it was a bacterial infection. Though she nearly died, her symptoms resolved in a few days, and I changed her to a high quality kibble diet, per the vet’s instructions. A month later, severe vomiting returned. This time, I didn’t give the antibiotics because I knew it wasn’t “raw food” related. Once again, the vet gave fluids and nausea meds and her symptoms were resolved. He said we would need to address her allergies (as she was itching again) but agreed that Cytopoint may have caused her reaction, so we would deal with allergies once her vomiting had resolved.
After this incident, I changed her diet to a human grade, cooked diet. Her allergies subsided and haven’t returned.

Sadly, about once a month she has violent vomiting episodes. I believe 100% that Cytopoint has caused this. Prior to Cytopoint, my dog had never had diarrhea or vomiting episodes. Ever. Now we have unexplained vomiting that happens monthly for no apparent reason?? My dog lives indoors, and I watch her when she goes potty (in my yard). I keep a clean home (nothing for her to get into), and I monitor her diet closely bc of her allergies. I am going to take her to an integrative vet and see if we can resolve the vomiting issue or at least detox her. Has anyone else’s dog had a similar reaction?
So sorry this has happened to your sweet dog. Our yorkie has had cytopoint shots for awhile now and I have been concerned about their effects. She has previously had some digestive issues, but now she is vomiting some and having diarrhea. The vet kept saying it is gastritis or IBS but am sure this has made her sick. The stories I have read while researching cytopoint are horrific and inexcusable behavior, as well as stubborn ignorance, on the part of veterinarians. We are looking for a more wholistic vet now and I will never give her cytopoint again. I just hope we can get her over these problems.
 

Mayasmom

New member
Joined
Jul 13, 2021
Original Poster
I am so sorry to hear about your little Yorkie. A holistic vet is worth their weight in gold! I just found out ours retired and I’m heartbroken. I am doing probiotics, enzymes, goats milk, and a fresh diet. I am praying it helps. If you find out anything please keep me updated. I love how helpful this forum is.
 

Pbt

New member
Joined
Aug 19, 2021
Anyone else’s dog almost die after a Cytopoint injection?? My 2 year old pit/ American Bull mix has suffered with allergies from day one. I have had her since she was weaned, and have always had her on a very limited vaccine schedule. She was on a limited raw food diet and was still suffering terrible allergies. When the vet recommended Cytopoint, I should have done more research, but at that point I felt so bad for her, I just wanted to believe something would help. The first 2 shots were like a miracle. Her itching was relieved (mostly), hair on her face grew back, and ear infections stopped.

Then she had her 3rd Cytopoint shot and everything went wrong. Less than 24 hours later, she had unstoppable diarrhea, followed by no appetite and vomiting. She shivered a lot and was in obvious distress. The vet blamed it on her raw diet. She was treated with anti nausea meds, fluids, and antibiotics, as the vet was convinced it was a bacterial infection. Though she nearly died, her symptoms resolved in a few days, and I changed her to a high quality kibble diet, per the vet’s instructions. A month later, severe vomiting returned. This time, I didn’t give the antibiotics because I knew it wasn’t “raw food” related. Once again, the vet gave fluids and nausea meds and her symptoms were resolved. He said we would need to address her allergies (as she was itching again) but agreed that Cytopoint may have caused her reaction, so we would deal with allergies once her vomiting had resolved.
After this incident, I changed her diet to a human grade, cooked diet. Her allergies subsided and haven’t returned.

Sadly, about once a month she has violent vomiting episodes. I believe 100% that Cytopoint has caused this. Prior to Cytopoint, my dog had never had diarrhea or vomiting episodes. Ever. Now we have unexplained vomiting that happens monthly for no apparent reason?? My dog lives indoors, and I watch her when she goes potty (in my yard). I keep a clean home (nothing for her to get into), and I monitor her diet closely bc of her allergies. I am going to take her to an integrative vet and see if we can resolve the vomiting issue or at least detox her. Has anyone else’s dog had a similar reaction?
Yes with my 10 year old boxer after his 2nd shot. I won’t give him another one if he can just pull through.
 

slatham

New member
Joined
Nov 29, 2021
I've just come across this thread whilst searching for Cytopoint side effects.

The first two injections did little (good or bad), but the third actually increased the inflammation, in the ears and exposed underside, and also resulted in early morning vomiting. This vomiting was associated with excessive licking of the lips. Usually it's just saliva which is vomited rather than stomach contents. This has made me fearful of putting him under anaesthesia for ear cleaning which he badly needs, since inflammation causes lots of wax.

My dog is a Labrador-German Shepherd cross.
 

TTouch

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
The issues are two fold, 'we' are told " go to your vet" for any pet issue, this gives people the impression that vets are the be all and end all for EVERYTHING and that is simply not true. As humans 'we' are lazy, 'we' want a 'cure', a magic pill or magic wand so 'we' don't have to put the effort in and research 'why' the issue exists and what 'we' can do to resolve it or help to resolve it.

Many dogs have genetic issues, simple over breeding of the wrong stock and/or indiscriminate breeding to achieve financial gain and/or replicate breed standards that are fashionable at the time with little regards to the other negative issues...bearing in mind that maybe one pup ( if lucky with genetics) out of a litter is show standard and the rest are pet standard only and should NEVER be bred with, should be neutered before they go into the pet market...then you get the crossbred market either deliberate cross breeding or what is called 'accidental mating' although that is ignorant breeding from owners who choose not to neuter, have or allow males/females to mix and breed and/or to make money, so unknowledgable owners about the breed/s producing far from healthy pups.

You have a lab/GSD cross, both breeds have their negative health issues in some lines, with known sensitive stomach and ear problems and because of their over breeding in the last 30 yrs hip displasia and spine issues....so choosing the right pup from the right healthy lines is important, with rescue getting a cross or breed it is important to get the pup health checked before you take it on which is about the limit of research you can do.

Food fed and exercise is down to us owners, BOTH make a difference to the mental, physical and health of the dog and training of the pup/dog starting day one is also important as that training can mean your dog will accept/tolerate such things as nail clipping, ear and/or teeth cleaning, it also means your dog will accept/tolerate you removing a thorn or piece of glass from its paw. The food 'we' feed them can and does affect their immune system which in turn affects their coat/skin and itching, over bathing and using shampoos/conditioners does affect their immune system, lack of weekly grooming also affects them ...so it is important the pet you have is trained to accept handling to enable the care they need or potentially could need.

Lots of things can cause earwax like a Bony blockage (osteoma or exostoses) · Infectious disease, (external otitis) · Skin disease (such as eczema) , so genetic, lack of cleaning and not keeping the immune system working optimally and the immune system is what protects us and our dogs so should be the first area for your research, increase your dogs natural immune system....
Kibble, medications, environmental conditions affect the immune system... so real meat as in raw feeding you have more control of what is going into their system, with kibble you have no clue and kibble feeding is the main reason dogs itch ( and causes inflammation) and when they scratch they damage their skin( or ears) which allows a secondary infection to take hold meaning the issue gets worse which leads to vet trips and medication but there is no magic pill...

I am not someone who believes in 'cover up' medication...and that is what Cytopoint is, it covers up the issue, it doesn't cure it, the ONLY benefits are to the vet who gets repeat expensive visits and the manufacturers of it.
 


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