Help! Fishtank cloudy and fish at top of tank

Lynda6877

New member
Joined
Jan 6, 2020
Hello. Im a new fish owner. I got 2 fish yesterday. The tank was set up 24 hours before according to pet shop instructions. 24 hours later the water is going cloudy and the fish are keeping to the top of the water. Should I be concerned?
Many thanks. Really new to this! Lynda
 

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Hello. Im a new fish owner. I got 2 fish yesterday. The tank was set up 24 hours before according to pet shop instructions. 24 hours later the water is going cloudy and the fish are keeping to the top of the water. Should I be concerned?
Many thanks. Really new to this! Lynda
Yes, there is reason to be concerned.

Your tank is not cycled. I will post a article explaining the nitrogen cycle, it’s a must read.

To sum up the nitrogen cycle,

Fish produce ammonia (from poop, decaying matter, etc). Ammonia is toxic and builds up really fast in aquariums (especially small ones).

The nitrogen cycle is growing a colony of good bacteria in your filter. The bacteria eat ammonia and produce nitrite as a byproduct. Another group of bacteria then eat the nitrite and convert it to nitrate (which is less toxic and easy to get rid of via water changing).

fish can die in an uncycled tank (it’s called new tank syndrome). But don’t freak out! Panicking is the worst thing you can do.

In order to keep your fish safe, first thing to do is do a 40% water change (make sure to use dechorinator). As soon as you can, pic up a bottle of nitrifying bacteria (sold in the fish section at the pet store). Tetra safe start is a good one (I will put a link to it on amazon).

You are also going to need a test kit (I will put a link to one below).

Since you are doing a fish-in cycle, you will need to do daily water changes until you get that bottle of bacteria. After you get the safe start (or whatever brand you choose to use), do a large water change (maybe 50-60%), then dump the bottle in the filter and don’t change any of the water for 1-2 weeks. Then perform a large water change and continue to do weekly water changes.

During this process, if ammonia levels get above 0.5 ppm, then you will need to do a water change. Ammonia levels above 0.50 ppm are an immediate threat to your fish’s lives, and anything above 0.25 ppm is dangerous long term, but won’t pose an immediate threat during cycling.


Now, what is the tank size? What kind of fish are they? (this is very important information).
 

Last edited:

Top