Pronunciation of Chihuahua

CatMom1994

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
On a past Animal Planet show called Too Cute, the narrator pronounced it "chi-wah-wah." Now I am listening to an audio book about a chihuaha-dachshund mix. That book's author, who also is the reader, pronounces it "chi-wow-wuh." Since the breed is named after a city in Mexico, I assume only one pronunciation is correct. Does anyone know why somebody would say it wrong? How am I supposed to pronounce it?
 

TTouch

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
Dialect might affect what words people say and how they say them, which is the accent. so the same word can be pronounced differently depends on who is saying it. So clearly it is 'supposed ' to be pronounced as the Mexican city, however as words are pronounced differently depending on where in the country/world you live then someone elses pronouncation is not right or wrong, it is just the way they say it.
'Pronunciation' is the way we each individually produce sounds. The way we move our lips, tongue and jaw to articulate sounds.
 

mechi2

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2013
Location
Canada
I say chi-wa-wa but then again maybe someone hearing me say it thinks I pronounce it differently, Americans insist that Canadians pronounce the word "about" as "aboot" which to me sounds weird, I never heard anyone say "aboot".
 

TTouch

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
"Chi-wow-wa"

The word Chihuahua is of Nahuatl origin. The Nahuatl dialect is spoken by the indigenous Nahuan Aztecan people of Central Mexico.....so my guess is if they heard 'English' speakers across the world pronoucing it they would hear lots of variants of it
 

CatMom1994

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Original Poster
I say chi-wa-wa but then again maybe someone hearing me say it thinks I pronounce it differently, Americans insist that Canadians pronounce the word "about" as "aboot" which to me sounds weird, I never heard anyone say "aboot."
I never heard anyone say "aboot" in my 44 years of life. No, that is not how Americans say it.

The words that sound wrong when some people say them are A-dult (adult), Ki-yote (coyote). root (route), awnt (aunt), and JAG-you-ar (jaguar).
 
Last edited:

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
I never heard anyone say "aboot" in my 44 years of life. No, that is not how Americans say it.

The words that sound wrong when some people say them are A-dult (adult), Ki-yote (coyote). root (route), awnt (aunt), and JAG-you-ar (jaguar).
“About” is how most Americans say it, but some people with strong Canadian accents sound like they are saying “aboot” instead. It’s technically the same pronunciation, it just sounds different because of the accent.
 

mechi2

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2013
Location
Canada
So what is a strong Canadian accent? To me a Canadian accent sounds like the standard American accent. But apparently you Americans can tell the difference, when my brother was down in New Orleans with his friends people there right away knew they were from Canada.

Dialects and regional accents always fascinated me making me wonder how they came about. What really gets my curiosity going is how and when did North Americans lose their British accents and why do Australians and New Zealandlers sound nothing like North Americans.
 

CatMom1994

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Original Poster
So what is a strong Canadian accent? To me a Canadian accent sounds like the standard American accent. But apparently you Americans can tell the difference, when my brother was down in New Orleans with his friends people there right away knew they were from Canada.

Dialects and regional accents always fascinated me making me wonder how they came about. What really gets my curiosity going is how and when did North Americans lose their British accents and why do Australians and New Zealandlers sound nothing like North Americans.
Many people in New Orleans have a different accent (called southern) from most Americans. My BIL has always lived in Mississippi and I can hear a big difference. There is also a New York City accent, which sounds similar to British. Although I am from Ohio my accent sounds a little southern when I say certain words and phrases. Here is something weird: I sounded like a southerner when I called Daisy, but that word sounds normal in a conversation about her.
 


Top