Shedding or Fungus on Turtle’s Neck and Legs? Advice Appreciated!

CaitlinCat

New member
Joined
Jun 15, 2020
I’ve noticed on my baby turtle that there are white thread-like fuzzy stuff on their neck and legs. Each thread is the same size and shape, so I am thinking it might be fungus. The threads can only be seen when in the water. When they come out of the water, the threads are not visible. Can anyone help me identify what this is and provide advice on how to best handle it? Thank you! F5D15B1B-0B60-4A62-BFAF-DA7183446DB0.jpeg748DF2DE-E055-453A-B828-9E3240995461.jpeg
 

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
I’ve noticed on my baby turtle that there are white thread-like fuzzy stuff on their neck and legs. Each thread is the same size and shape, so I am thinking it might be fungus. The threads can only be seen when in the water. When they come out of the water, the threads are not visible. Can anyone help me identify what this is and provide advice on how to best handle it? Thank you! View attachment 10208View attachment 10209
I can’t tell exactly what that is, but the first thing I would do is a large waterchange. If it’s fungal or bacterial, dirty water is one of the worst things for it.

After that, hopefully someone with more experienced with turtles can help you treat whatever it is.
 

CaitlinCat

New member
Joined
Jun 15, 2020
Original Poster
I can’t tell exactly what that is, but the first thing I would do is a large waterchange. If it’s fungal or bacterial, dirty water is one of the worst things for it.

After that, hopefully someone with more experienced with turtles can help you treat whatever it is.
I appreciate your reply. I changed his water a few days ago, but I plan to do it again. I also got a new filter to help.
 

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
I appreciate your reply. I changed his water a few days ago, but I plan to do it again. I also got a new filter to help.
Just save the old filter media (filter sponges) and put them in your new filter.

In the filter is where your healthy nitrifying bacteria grows. Nitrifying bacteria consumes the ammonia the tank inhabitants produce and convert it to nitrite, then nitrate. It helps to keep a safe environment for your turtle. Ammonia is toxic and can build in just a few days if there is no colony of healthy bacteria.

To clean filter sponges/media, just ring them out in a bucket of tank water or dechlorinated tap water. If for some reason it really needs to be replaced, then only replace half of it, then wait a couple weeks to replace the other half so your colony stays alive.

This stuff is much more important with fish since fish are a little more sensitive and can die if ammonia builds up at all, but it’s still important in turtle tanks. Ammonia and nitrite build up can make turtles sick and/or weaken their immune system so they are more susceptible to shell rot and such.
 

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Thank you for the information and advice!
No problem.:);)

I’m afraid with the finer details in turtle care I’m a little less experienced though. I’m mostly into planted aquariums and such. I know plenty about cycling, water chemistry, fertilizers, etc, but I’ve never actually kept turtles myself, so I won’t be a lot of help on the fine points of turtle care.
 


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