Study Shows One In Three Puppies Purchased Online Fall Sick And Die Before First Birthday

linda2147

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
Nearly one-third of the puppies purchased online will die or get seriously sick before they reach 1 year old.

Research conducted by the Kennel Club in the UK found that at least 18 percent of the 240,000 puppies bought online each year, raised by breeding facilities and shipped directly to the new owners, soon come down with a debilitating disease that will eventually take their lives. The organization polled 2,176 dog owners and found that the urge for “Instant gratification” was much more prevalent in many than the responsibility of a living creature would warrant.
“The internet is making it easier than ever before to buy things instantly, and this is having an alarming impact on the way people expect to buy a puppy,” said Kennel Club secretary Caroline Kisko. “A shocking number of people are spending less than two hours researching their puppy purchase and this is leading to a serious welfare crisis.

“Rogue dog breeders selling directly to puppy buyers can be masking terrible conditions and the yawning gap in puppy buyer awareness about how to identify a good breeder leaves people – and dogs – very vulnerable.”
According to the Mirror, about a third of those who have bought their animals online do less than a few hours of research before committing to the purchase, while around 12 percent do no research at all.

The result is often mounting medical bills and a much larger responsibility than pet owners anticipated. At least a fifth of those who bought their pets online spend between $600 and $1,200 on veterinary bills, and often more, in the first six months alone.
“It’s absolutely shocking that people are still buying puppies online or from newspaper adverts without seeing the puppy first,” Kisko said at a Puppy Awareness Week event. “Not only do puppies end up suffering as a result of being irresponsibly bred or sold, but consumers are being utterly duped into thinking they will end up with a healthy puppy, when the reality is that buying a pup from a disreputable source will cost them dearly, both emotionally and financially.”

At highest risk are designer breed dogs, like Cockapoos, Puggles, and Schnoodles, which, the Daily Record reports, are an easy way for unscrupulous breeders to make money by offering unique animals.

Lucy’s Law, introduced in Parliament in July, is hoped to reduce the number of sick and dying pets by banning the third party sale of puppies. People buying dogs under 6 months old must now meet with the breeder, animal rescue, or individual offering the pet for sale.
The government’s plans to ban the third party sale of puppies, through pet shops and the like, is hugely welcome but puppy buyers shouldn’t become complacent.

Dos and don'ts of buying a puppy

 

APafDog&CatMom

New member
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
I'm glad something is being done. Puppy mill resellers can be very convincing in the US. Most likely, that is where Laurel came from, although she was always treated with love by what I believed was her breeder. I have a verbal promise to return her if anything happens, but my Pastor's number is on her microchip info for now.

She looks almost exactly like my friend's dog, although she was sold to me as 3/4 Chihuahua and 1/4 Minpin. My friend was going through a divorce and had to "sell down", so she decided to fulfill her childhood dream and buy a Papillon. She researched breeders online, because we live in a rural area, and got on a waitlist.

After spending several thousand dollars and driving several hundred miles to pick up Festus, she was thrilled. However, he soon developed health problems and the breeder was hard to get ahold of. He also didn't look as much like a Papillon as he got older. When the breeder's website suddenly disappeared, she had Festus DNA tested and the results were that he is 1/2 Chihuahua and 1/2 Yorkshire Terrier.

Laurel looks almost exactly like him. Every time I take her for a walk, someone stops me to say that they know (and love) a dog who looks just like her. This cross was very popular in the '90s and '00s and less so now, so my fear is that our dogs are "overstock" or "surplus products" that were dumped on us. I also know now that I was not given proper care instructions for such a young Chihuahua cross puppy and that she would have died if I hadn't gotten other advice from other people.

My friend says that this was the intention all along. The puppies are very cute and companionable and can be passed off as whatever toy breed is popular. As long as they don't grow up, the buyer/stooge is never the wiser.

I love my dog, but I wasn't about to take that risk again.

My second dog didn't cost money. Her previous owner couldn't keep her and she needed a home. It's different and not as easy as raising a cute young puppy, but every day we seem to fall more and more in love with each other and learn new things about each other.
 

linda2147

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
Original Poster
Its a sad situation and its the dogs that suffer. When people talk about getting a "designer pet" its just a mixed breed with a fancy name. Nothing against the dog or mixed breeds but when you think about it the shelters are full of "designer breeds" And the more people buy from these so called breeders it only encourages them to breed more. There is nothing wrong with mixed breeds, they make wonderful pets as much as any purebred but why line the pockets of these people when you can go to a shelter and probably find the same mix?
 

Emmabarnes

Zumba Instructor
Joined
Jul 17, 2019
Location
Destin
Seriously this is so sad. I've see it happen amongst friend's pets and it's heartbreaking. I think that it's important to discuss this with other pet owners and encourage the adoption of shelter pets.
 


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