That viral snake bite video

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
So, a lot of people were freaking out about this video saying “This is why you shouldn’t keeps snakes as pets people!” Or “Snakes are dangerous animals, not pets.”

I want to start off by saying, would you judge all pet dogs by a wild pit used in dog fighting being put in a cage with a human holding raw chicken?

This snake was clearly wild or at least partially wild. It was being kept in the same room as its food (you can see the mice in the background).
Wild snake smells mice, sees heat signature of hand slowly moving towards. Snake strikes.

Handling a large partially wild snake is a bad idea, but when it’s hungry and smells food is outright stupid. This lady was likely either trying to get bitten on camera for views (hence the cameraman conveniently recording it all) or just didn’t know anything about reptiles.

Please don’t judge all pet snakes by this, just like you wouldn’t judge house cats by wild mountain lions.

 

Alpha1

Pack Leader and Lover
Joined
Mar 28, 2012
Location
USA
I didn't watch the video, but I agree with you. People have to be smarter than the animals they handle. I wouldn't have know this video was viral unless you said so. So much of the way animals react is a product of their handlers.
 

CatMom1994

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
I didn't watch the video, but I agree with you. People have to be smarter than the animals they handle. I wouldn't have known this video was viral unless you said so. So much of the way animals react is a product of their handlers.
Yes and people need to understand wild means wild. Except for trained staff at zoos and animal sanctuaries, humans have to keep their hands off all wild animals.
 

PhoenixKoi

New member
Joined
Mar 22, 2021
Ive seen this video before with a caption like "Woman gets bit and strangled by pet snake!" And honestly i think its outright stupid, and no matter how many times you tell people they still think its the snakes fualt.

I would also like to point out that the enclosure the snake is in happends to be a top opening cage/tank which is not great for snakes and small animals in general.

If you have an only top opening cage/tank the only way to get to the animal is to reach down on them from above which can cause the animal to think you are a predator and are likely to try and bite you to get away from you.

I do realize that the snake did bite and wrap around her like she was prey so this may not have been its motive this time but it will be at some point.

Anyways, I thought I might point that out and make afew of you aware that top opening tanks/cages can be dangerous to the owner and pet.
 

PhoenixKoi

New member
Joined
Mar 22, 2021
Sorry if he already covered this in the video, I only got about 2 minutes into the video. I would like to add to my previous statment that the snake has severe stuck shed all over its body especially on the tail and head impling bad humidity and bad husbandry in general. Again, Sorry if this was already covered in the video. I wanted to put this out there for people who havent watched it.
 

TTouch

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
So, a lot of people were freaking out about this video saying “This is why you shouldn’t keeps snakes as pets people!” Or “Snakes are dangerous animals, not pets.”

I want to start off by saying, would you judge all pet dogs by a wild pit used in dog fighting being put in a cage with a human holding raw chicken?
It matters not what type of animal is used, these silly videos are taken by humans as they want to promote themselves/have 5 mins of fame and shock/frighten people and it only 'goes viral' when others keep posting it....

.... and I agree with the quotes you wrote (even if they are from a silly video or not, not watched it and won't ) “This is why you shouldn’t keeps snakes as pets people!” Or “Snakes are dangerous animals, not pets.”....... many people are fearful of Arachnids and Reptiles for any number of reasons and the majority of people do not have the knowledge to have either as a pet....so from shocking people to reinforcing fear or to stop some idiot getting a snake as a pet who then has no clue about looking after them correctly...... as no one who likes snakes will take any notice of a video made by fame hungry humans to shock/create fear.

The people who like Arachnids and Reptiles and have knowledge/experience of the care they need, it is the perfect pet for them
 

LittleGoldSnail

Crazy fish lady
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Original Poster
It matters not what type of animal is used, these silly videos are taken by humans as they want to promote themselves/have 5 mins of fame and shock/frighten people and it only 'goes viral' when others keep posting it....

.... and I agree with the quotes you wrote (even if they are from a silly video or not, not watched it and won't ) “This is why you shouldn’t keeps snakes as pets people!” Or “Snakes are dangerous animals, not pets.”....... many people are fearful of Arachnids and Reptiles for any number of reasons and the majority of people do not have the knowledge to have either as a pet....so from shocking people to reinforcing fear or to stop some idiot getting a snake as a pet who then has no clue about looking after them correctly...... as no one who likes snakes will take any notice of a video made by fame hungry humans to shock/create fear.

The people who like Arachnids and Reptiles and have knowledge/experience of the care they need, it is the perfect pet for them
But rather then scaring people out of them, we should try to educate people better.

Because of videos like this and lack of knowledge about reptiles, many people thinks it’s wrong to have them as pets or that they are “bad” animals. I know quite a few people who try to stop others (knowledgeable reptile lovers) from having pet snakes or even wish to make it illegal because they don’t know anything about them and think “snakes are snakes.”

It’s a mentality of being afraid of something you don't understand. Rather then posting videos like this, I support more widespread education and training around snakes and reptiles, just like cats and dogs.

It really isn’t any different than a dog. If someone doesn’t know anything about them, you don’t try and fear monger them out of getting a dog, you educate them about dogs and maybe encourage them not to get one or recommend a different breed.
 

CatMom1994

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Where is Cat when we need her? She is our reptile expert.

People need to know which species are pets which ones must always be wild.
 

TTouch

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
But rather then scaring people out of them, we should try to educate people better.
Then why post it? All you are doing is adding to that 5 mins of fame they are after and increasing its 'value' of viral continuation.

It’s a mentality of being afraid of something you don't understand.
But I do understand.
However I am assuming you are speaking about people in general who have developed a 'fear' and that video won't help to relay their fear instead it will just prove to those people they are 'correct' so re enforce their own fear based belief system.

Rather then posting videos like this, I support more widespread education and training around snakes and reptiles
You did post the video!

When it comes to snakes, 'fear' generally would be classed as a phobia which is an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to them.

The universal trigger for fear in ALL animals, humans or others is the threat of harm, real or imagined. This threat can be for our physical, emotional or psychological well-being. While there are certain things that trigger fear in most of us, we can learn to become afraid of nearly anything, so add to that trigger learned.

If you (and my guess is you like and understand snakes) then it would be far better to post about the positives of owning one, the learning you have aquired about them, however even then you will convince no one who has a fear/phobia to like them, as anything said attacks 'their beleif system' and humans do not like to be wrong however irrational they already know that beleif system is.
 
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Cat001

Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2013
Location
Nottingham, UK
As it’s owner, I’m pretty shocked she didn’t read that snakes body language at all. Clearly the snake was in ‘food mode’. I would guess the snake is accustomed to being fed in its enclosure and assumed it was going through the routine of ‘door open, food offered’, and mistook her hand for food. This is made worse by the fact that, as you pointed out, mice are in the same room as the snake, confounding the mistake.

I have a corn snake that behaves in this manner as she’s overly enthusiastically greedy, but I know how to communicate to her that there is no food. If I want to pick her up I’ve trained her by associating being petted with the snake hook with being picked up straight after. She knows then that it’s not feeding time but she’s being moved. Sanitising your hands can also prevent bites as they don’t like the smell. I also have them associate a certain tapping on their enclosure with food, this tapping gets them to come to me which makes it easier to check on and access them. Training can really help the snake understand what’s going on and is a great tool for reducing stress. I’ve had a few anxious snakes that have become friendly through training.

When my snake has got me in the past (which is very rare) I find the quickest way to get her to let go is a tiny dab of hand sanitiser near her mouth as it tastes disgusting to them. The other option that I find works with corns is to simply stay very still and wait for them to let go when they realise their mistake (although wouldn’t advise this for such a big snake as in the video as the situation is more urgent). I’ve only been bitten when I’ve not paid enough attention to their body language and they’re due a feed (once I was stupid enough to pet a rabbit and not wash my hands before picking snake up).

When it comes to biting out of fear, most snakes are bite aversive and use it only as a last resort. They will usually give a visual cue for you to back off first in the form of S-shape posturing and tail rattling. If that doesn’t work they’ll escalate their warning by striking the air or what’s called ‘symbolic striking’, which involves striking with a closed mouth as a warning to indicate they are very afraid and will attack if pushed further. My most anxious snake used to strike me with closed mouth when he was particularly anxious (basically head butting me during moves for clean-out if I startled him) but never actually bit me. Working with him on his anxieties over the years, he’s now a friendly inquisitive boy and would be difficult to get him to strike now (as it was only done out of fear, not aggression).

Moving back to the video, I definitely agree that a front-loading enclosure would be far more appropriate than a top-loading enclosure for both practicality and to reduce stress induced by coming in at an angle of perceived attack. I much prefer wooden vivariums to glass as they hold heat better and are lighter so are more practical to be made in larger custom sizes. I’d definitely have this snake in a much larger enclosure and agree that its environmental conditions likely haven’t been adequately met. Stuck shed is definitely not an ideal situation and is not usually a good sign. There’s a lot of reflection on the glass but looks like the enclosure is completely barren with no hides/ humidity hide, nothing for the snake to interact with, no form of enrichment at all.

Regarding wildlife and the pet trade, I personally disagree with the capture of wild animals for trading as pets, luckily, the reptiles commonly sold as pets are usually Captive Bred (CB), and often have been for many many generations. However, Wild Caught (WC) individuals do exist, although are often not recommended as they usually experience higher levels of stress than their CB counterparts, can carry diseases and parasites and consequently often don’t live as long. There are some exceptions to raising WC animals (such as for conservation purposes) but I'm generally against it for the pet trade. CB reptiles should not be released into the wild for a number of reasons. For instance, they may possess genetics that can be ultimately detrimental to wild populations, can lack appropriate behaviours for survival as they are unaccustomed to wild living, or are released in an entirely inappropriate environment which can either kill the individual outright or the individual thrives and becomes invasive. I do feel there needs to be greater education on this matter as well as on the care of reptiles in general. It can be damaging if people hold the perception that snakes are emotionless, instinctive, soulless creatures as they are actually full of personality, can be very inquisitive and frustratingly smart when it comes to figuring out how to open their enclosures. For anyone getting a reptile I always recommend checking local rescues first or researching reputable breeders who take appropriate care of their animals. They are thinking, feeling creatures and deserve the best care possible like any other animal.

Just realised how long my post has gotten, hope I haven't gotten too off-track, I'm just a bit passionate about these animals lol.
 


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