This Massive Lizard Threatens Gators and Charges People, and It's Invading Georgia

linda2147

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An ugly and invasive lizard is making a new home in the state of Georgia, threatening native species as dangerous as the American alligator.

According to the Georgia De
COMMENTARYThis Massive Lizard Threatens Gators and Charges People, and It's Invading Georgia
By Jared Harris
Published May 17, 2020 at 6:59am
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An ugly and invasive lizard is making a new home in the state of Georgia, threatening native species as dangerous as the American alligator.
According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Argentine black and white tegu has so far only been confirmed in two counties in the state.

The lizards, which can grow up to four feet long, have been confirmed in Toombs and Tattnall counties. Authorities are urging residents to remove outdoor pet food that could present an easy meal for the beasts.

partment of Natural Resources, the Argentine black and white tegu has so far only been confirmed in two counties in the state.

COMMENTARYThis Massive Lizard Threatens Gators and Charges People, and It's Invading Georgia
By Jared Harris
Published May 17, 2020 at 6:59am
ShareTweetEmailPrint
An ugly and invasive lizard is making a new home in the state of Georgia, threatening native species as dangerous as the American alligator.
According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Argentine black and white tegu has so far only been confirmed in two counties in the state.

The lizards, which can grow up to four feet long, have been confirmed in Toombs and Tattnall counties. Authorities are urging residents to remove outdoor pet food that could present an easy meal for the beasts.
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Native to South America, it’s believed that the wild breeding populations in the United States are descendants of released pet tegus.
Females can lay roughly 35 eggs every year, explaining the species’ explosion in growth. While only confirmed in two Georgia counties, the tegu may soon make its way north.
Thankfully, residents are cleared to engage the cold-blooded invaders to help stem the tide.

“Note that as a non-native species, tegus in the wild in Georgia are not protected by state wildlife laws or regulations,” the Georgia DNR states.

“They can be legally trapped or killed.”
 

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