Tips to avoid going to the vet

gul.Impact

In love with the most innocent..
Joined
Aug 16, 2019
Best Tips to Avoid Going to the Vet
Exercise your dog
You already know that exercise is good for your body. What you may not know is that it is also good for your dog. Your dog doesn’t have to be part of a yoga class or to do any straining activity to become fit, even the simplest things such as walking and playing fun games (Frisbee) can go a long way.
Routine Care
Brushing your dog’s teeth, clipping its nails and cleaning its ears should become a routine part of grooming your dog. The internet has a plethora of guides and videos that can show you to take care of your dog or any other pets. Neglecting your dog routine care every day can make your dog vulnerable to sickness, meaning that it will cost you a few bucks.
Maintain a good standard of Hygiene
Like humans, dogs can get sick because of bad hygiene practices. Maintaining good hygiene habits does not only benefit your own health, but it also impacts the health of your four-footed companion. A good standard of hygiene entails a clean and comfortable bed, clean clothes and clean dishes.
Keep them in a safe place
Your dog needs to have a sense of security, especially when left home alone. Most of the dog owners may feel that confining their dogs in a crate is being cruel and abusive, but if done for appropriate reasons, it can benefit your four-footed buddy.
You wouldn’t want to come back home to find your dog injured or your furniture in shambles.This is why you have to get a sturdy strong crate that guarantees safety and comfort for your dog.
Socialization
Socialization is as good to dogs as it is to humans. If you are one of those people who enjoy indoor activities that's cool. But for the sanity of your dog, you just have to go hang around with your four-footed companion in different environments like dog parks and doggie daycares. Meeting new people will help ease your dog’s anxiety and aggression.
Keep away from stress
Hiding or escape behavior, panting, shedding, yawning or drooling, whining, shaking, decrease in appetite, isolation, increased sleeping and aggression towards other people.
These are some indicators that can show that your pooch is under stress. Yes, our furry companions can be stressed too. In fact, stress is more common in dogs than you may think.
Humans are guilty of stressing out their dogs even though they may not know it. If you are in a stress mode, dogs can absorb your emotions and mirror your stress.
Vaccinations
Making sure that your furry friend’s vaccinations are up-to-date should be on top of the list of your priorities. Dog vaccination provides immunity and it remains an effective method for protecting against these diseases: infectious hepatitis, rabies, bordetella, feline leukemia, distemper, parvovirus, and many more.
Prevention is better than cure.
Vet check-ups
It’s important that you schedule two annual appointments with your vet for a thorough check-up. This should be done so that if there is any potential threat to your dog’s health, the vet can stymie it before it develops.
Observe physical signs of heartworm infection
One of the simplest ways of uncovering a heartworm infection in dogs is by letting your vet administer a blood test. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t observe physical signs yourself. Be worried if your dog begins to cough, has a decreased appetite, there is blood in its urine or is inactive.
Watch out for your dog’s allergic reactions
Humans do not want to get any closer to anything that gives them an allergic reaction? So are dogs, but unfortunately, it cannot communicate that to you. As a pet parent, it’s your
responsibility that the dog stays out of reach to anything they are allergic to. Dog allergic reactions can range from mild to severe and sometimes, they can be life-threatening.
Encourage a balanced diet
The adage, “you are what you eat” also rings true to dogs. The quality of food you give your dog each day will affect its health —today, tomorrow and in the future.
Dogs have their own nutritional needs that help them to maintain a healthy weight and normal growth.
If you want your dog to live longer and lead a happy lifestyle, make sure that it has a balanced diet and avoid giving it the following:
  • Chocolate
  • Garlic and onions
  • Salty foods
  • Dairy products (cheese and milk)
Spaying or Neutering
One of the most important/best health decisions you will ever make for your dog is to have it spayed or neutered. These two surgically procedures, performed by a veterinarian, are performed to prevent dogs from reproducing and they offer several lifelong health benefits such as eliminating the possibility of uterine, ovarian testicular cancer and prostate disease.
Humans also benefit from these two procedures in that their dogs get friendlier, less temperament and less likely to attack other people or other dogs.
However, spaying or neutering dogs is not for every breed. It's best that you consult your veterinarian when you have decided to have your pooch spayed or neutered.
Good Training
That sociability mentioned earlier becomes easier when your dog is taught to listen to your voice commands.
A trained dog will not only save you dollars, but it will guarantee you peace of mind as well. Untrained dogs have a tendency of misbehaving and at times, it's a challenge to ensure their protection.
Keep any medication out of their reach
Dogs have a tendency of chewing everything in sight, and sometimes, this might come with life-threatening consequences.
If you have any sort of medicine in the house, be extra careful where you leave it. Whether they are pet or human drugs, there should be stored in a place that is out of your dog’s reach and in a place that is securely locked up.
Love your dog
Always maintain a positive relationship with them so that they don’t get depressed or feel isolated.
 

Emmabarnes

Zumba Instructor
Joined
Jul 17, 2019
Location
Destin
Best Tips to Avoid Going to the Vet
Exercise your dog
You already know that exercise is good for your body. What you may not know is that it is also good for your dog. Your dog doesn’t have to be part of a yoga class or to do any straining activity to become fit, even the simplest things such as walking and playing fun games (Frisbee) can go a long way.
Routine Care
Brushing your dog’s teeth, clipping its nails and cleaning its ears should become a routine part of grooming your dog. The internet has a plethora of guides and videos that can show you to take care of your dog or any other pets. Neglecting your dog routine care every day can make your dog vulnerable to sickness, meaning that it will cost you a few bucks.
Maintain a good standard of Hygiene
Like humans, dogs can get sick because of bad hygiene practices. Maintaining good hygiene habits does not only benefit your own health, but it also impacts the health of your four-footed companion. A good standard of hygiene entails a clean and comfortable bed, clean clothes and clean dishes.
Keep them in a safe place
Your dog needs to have a sense of security, especially when left home alone. Most of the dog owners may feel that confining their dogs in a crate is being cruel and abusive, but if done for appropriate reasons, it can benefit your four-footed buddy.
You wouldn’t want to come back home to find your dog injured or your furniture in shambles.This is why you have to get a sturdy strong crate that guarantees safety and comfort for your dog.
Socialization
Socialization is as good to dogs as it is to humans. If you are one of those people who enjoy indoor activities that's cool. But for the sanity of your dog, you just have to go hang around with your four-footed companion in different environments like dog parks and doggie daycares. Meeting new people will help ease your dog’s anxiety and aggression.
Keep away from stress
Hiding or escape behavior, panting, shedding, yawning or drooling, whining, shaking, decrease in appetite, isolation, increased sleeping and aggression towards other people.
These are some indicators that can show that your pooch is under stress. Yes, our furry companions can be stressed too. In fact, stress is more common in dogs than you may think.
Humans are guilty of stressing out their dogs even though they may not know it. If you are in a stress mode, dogs can absorb your emotions and mirror your stress.
Vaccinations
Making sure that your furry friend’s vaccinations are up-to-date should be on top of the list of your priorities. Dog vaccination provides immunity and it remains an effective method for protecting against these diseases: infectious hepatitis, rabies, bordetella, feline leukemia, distemper, parvovirus, and many more.
Prevention is better than cure.
Vet check-ups
It’s important that you schedule two annual appointments with your vet for a thorough check-up. This should be done so that if there is any potential threat to your dog’s health, the vet can stymie it before it develops.
Observe physical signs of heartworm infection
One of the simplest ways of uncovering a heartworm infection in dogs is by letting your vet administer a blood test. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t observe physical signs yourself. Be worried if your dog begins to cough, has a decreased appetite, there is blood in its urine or is inactive.
Watch out for your dog’s allergic reactions
Humans do not want to get any closer to anything that gives them an allergic reaction? So are dogs, but unfortunately, it cannot communicate that to you. As a pet parent, it’s your
responsibility that the dog stays out of reach to anything they are allergic to. Dog allergic reactions can range from mild to severe and sometimes, they can be life-threatening.
Encourage a balanced diet
The adage, “you are what you eat” also rings true to dogs. The quality of food you give your dog each day will affect its health —today, tomorrow and in the future.
Dogs have their own nutritional needs that help them to maintain a healthy weight and normal growth.
If you want your dog to live longer and lead a happy lifestyle, make sure that it has a balanced diet and avoid giving it the following:
  • Chocolate
  • Garlic and onions
  • Salty foods
  • Dairy products (cheese and milk)
Spaying or Neutering
One of the most important/best health decisions you will ever make for your dog is to have it spayed or neutered. These two surgically procedures, performed by a veterinarian, are performed to prevent dogs from reproducing and they offer several lifelong health benefits such as eliminating the possibility of uterine, ovarian testicular cancer and prostate disease.
Humans also benefit from these two procedures in that their dogs get friendlier, less temperament and less likely to attack other people or other dogs.
However, spaying or neutering dogs is not for every breed. It's best that you consult your veterinarian when you have decided to have your pooch spayed or neutered.
Good Training
That sociability mentioned earlier becomes easier when your dog is taught to listen to your voice commands.
A trained dog will not only save you dollars, but it will guarantee you peace of mind as well. Untrained dogs have a tendency of misbehaving and at times, it's a challenge to ensure their protection.
Keep any medication out of their reach
Dogs have a tendency of chewing everything in sight, and sometimes, this might come with life-threatening consequences.
If you have any sort of medicine in the house, be extra careful where you leave it. Whether they are pet or human drugs, there should be stored in a place that is out of your dog’s reach and in a place that is securely locked up.
Love your dog
Always maintain a positive relationship with them so that they don’t get depressed or feel isolated.
Thank you! These are so helpful!
I love the last one :)
 

linda2147

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
I understand why shelters and rescues spay and neuter the dogs but if done early its not a good idea to spay or neuter before they are both physically and mentally mature. Those hormones are there for a reason and when done early the legs grow longer than normal which accounts for stretching the ligaments and in most cases its dogs done early that have the ACL tear which requires surgery and once one knee is blown within two years the other will go. I don't do my females until they have been in heat twice and have never had that problem. And an intact male is healthier than a neutered one. If they didn't need the hormones they wouldn't be there. I understand irresponsible owners and the overpopulation problem but not at the expense of a dog's health. Wait until they are fully mature, let them grow normally and let the hormones do their job

And over vaccinating isn't good for them either. Baby shot are necessary but all these boosters done yearly are not necessary. Most of the vaccines are good for about seven years. That bordella shot, up the nose, is useless, it only covers one strain so unless they get that particular germ its useless. Kennel cough is no worse that you getting a cold, they'll get over it.

As for cats the shot they are getting to prevent a certain thing may actually cause a full blow case of what you are trying to avoid. Cats only need the distemper shot. And of course the rabies shot if its law in some places.
 
Last edited:

linda2147

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
cons of early spay and neuter

Dr. Mike Petty writes:

Many of the clinical choices veterinarians make are so deeply ingrained that we often practice medicine without stopping to wonder why we do things the way we do, who decided it should be done that way and whether we are potentially causing our patients harm. Consider dewclaw removal in dogs. Many veterinarians perform this procedure on puppies based on the desire of either the breeder to improve aesthetics or the owner to guard against some possible future trauma that might injure the dewclaw. Yet those in the agility/sporting world not only understand the importance of this digit during athletic events, but they also know that osteoarthritis in the carpal joint develops in many dogs that have this digit removed as a puppy. The dewclaw is attached to and helps stabilize many of the carpal tendons and ligaments. Without this stabilization, carpal osteoarthritis might ensue, especially in canine athletes.

The decision to refuse dewclaw removal should be a relatively easy one, then, as the only issue to consider is educating breeders and owners about the dangers of the procedure; no larger societal issues are at play. If only that were the case when it comes to the timing of spay/neuter surgery.

Juvenile gonadectomy and canine health concerns

Since the start of my career 40 years ago, prepubertal spay/neuter has been the norm in the United States, usually performed in dogs about 6 months of age. I was told at the time that spayed female dogs had a 90% lower incidence of mammary tumors compared with intact females. As this practice became the norm for spay surgeries, neutering at the same age followed with no real reasoning behind it. It wasn’t until I became certified in canine rehabilitation 10 years ago that I became part of a discussion about the negative impact of prepubertal spay/neuter on canine conformation.

Puberty initiates a release of hormones that help close the epiphyseal plates on long bones. Absent this signal, the long bones grow beyond their intended length and interfere with the normal size and mechanical relationship between bone and joint.1 This abnormal relationship can lead to a variety of orthopedic issues, including an increased incidence of cranial cruciate rupture,2-4 hip dysplasia5 and patellar luxation.6 I can almost always predict whether a purebred dog was spayed or neutered prior to puberty based on conformational differences.

Over the past decade several other untoward health events related to juvenile spay/neuter surgery have come to light, including cancer and behavioral problems.4,7 Female golden retrievers spayed at an early age have a higher incidence of mast cell tumor, for example, and neutered male golden retrievers have a higher incidence of lymphosarcoma.4 Another study showed an increase in several types of cancer in Vizslas, including mast cell tumors, lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma.7 Interestingly, this same study also showed an increased incidence of behavioral disorders, including fear of storms. Results from another study showed up to a 38% increase in vaccine reactions in spayed and neutered dogs compared with intact dogs, but the age at which spay/neuter surgery occurred was not considered.8

Now that we know that there is a potential relationship between juvenile gonadectomy and health issues, I suspect that even more problems will be found as researchers examine different populations to compare dogs that undergo early and late spay/neuter with intact dogs.

Full article http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/reexamining-early-spay-neuter-paradigm-dogs?pageID=1
 

gul.Impact

In love with the most innocent..
Joined
Aug 16, 2019
Original Poster
Hi Linda. This is great insight. Thank you for sharing.

This is exactly why I was very cautious to say it is for every dog. Not just for dogs, but humans also, there is a big debate in using vaccines or other treatments but we always have to choose the best way. If not having a vaccine or neutering will cause more harm to the dog than having it, which is the case most of the time, I am sure the vet will suggest accordingly if you have a vet that you can trust.

We always have to keep ourselves up to date so that we know what new science will tell us but for the day, we have to go with the best solutions for our loved ones. I really hope we will take care of them so good that we will never need anything unnatural.
 

linda2147

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
you cant always rely on your vet. I love and trust my vet but when I hear the word "new" I say no. Not until its been tested and retested on thousands of dogs with a less than 1 per cent negative reaction I won't do it. Vets are now pushing the cytopoint shot for allergies. Dogs are dying from that shot, only one test was done on it and that was by the company that makes it. Some dogs may be ok with it but my dog isn't going to be one of the casualties. Remember that six month heartwrom shot? How many dogs died from that before it was pulled off the market?
You have to be proactive with your pets health, question everythng and if you are uncomfortable with it say no.

When my shepherd was six months old I had taken her in for the last of her baby shots, my regular vet wasn't in so I had to see someone else. That apt. did not go well. First she insisted on making an apt. to have her spayed. I said no, then she started saying what could happen if I don't have her done early. I said she will be done but not now, She kept it up and finally I said, its my dog, my choice, they she started on my feeding raw, when I pointed out dogs in the wild eat raw and she said "and how long do they live" I said "I don't know, do you?" I told her "you are not going to push me into doing anything I don't want, give her the shot and I want no more apts. with you. She is still at the practice but I've never had another apt. with her. Just because they are vets we still have the final say on whats to be done.
 

CatMom1994

Loving cats forever
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Location
Florida
Linda, have you read any sicentific researchv articles about the higher ACL tear risk in puppies?
 

linda2147

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
There is plenty of articles written by vets that agree with the early spay and neuter. I'm sure if you do some research you'll see for yourself that early spay and neuter is not a good idea and all reputable breeders do not spay or neuter their dogs early because they know about it
 

wombat

Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2012
Location
Australia
Those hormones are there for a reason and when done early the legs grow longer than normal which accounts for stretching the ligaments and in most cases its dogs done early that have the ACL tear which requires surgery and once one knee is blown within two years the other will go.
linda you are so right,we had to put our dear Shepherd put to sleep earlier this year because of that very reason,she was under sedation to have her operation on one leg, and the vet said she would most likely have to have the other one done not to long afterwards, that meant having her locked in the laundry for 3 months for one to heal, then she would have to have it done again, it would have been too much for her as we have steps at our back and front door so it would have been too painful, so we had to make that painful decision while she was under.
 

linda2147

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
I'm so sorry you lost your girl. Its heartbreaking to loose them for any reason. I try to warn people not to spay or neuter young but most don't listen. My sister had a beautiful rotti, I begged her not to neuter him at eight months old but she said she didn't believe it. When he was about two he blew the first knee, and shortly after she came home from work and found him on the floor, rushed him to the vet, his spleen had exploded, he had surgery but then they found a type of blood cancer associated with early neuter. She is a believer now but to late
 

CatMom1994

Loving cats forever
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Location
Florida
Linda, when I was reading about kittens before adopting Emily, all of the literature said 6 months for girls and 8 months for boys. But at one store, I talked to a lady who said vets are starting to spay and neuter kittens much earlier. The shelter I adopted Emily at had a 6-month requirement so I waited that long. (My own vet had to do it, not them.) But two years later I adopted Patricia from a different shelter that spays and neuters animals when they are 3 months old. They require people to bring their kittens and puppies to bring them back to do the surgery themselves if the animals are too young when they are adopted (which Patricia was). Both cats were fine after being spayed.
 

linda2147

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
New Hampshire
This doesn't seem to affect cats, I've never heard of a cat having an ACL tear. Shelters will do kittens as soon as they weigh two pounds, no matter how old they are. My vet will not spay or neuter cats until the growth plates close at around five months. Cats mature much faster than dogs and kittens as young as four months old can become pregnant and males should be done no later than five months old before they can become sexually active to avoid spraying
 


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